Meet the Staff: Lissette Miller

Meet the Staff

cancer sun / capricorn moon

Lissette Miller (they/she) is a queer Black Latinx Miami grrrl living and breathing in DC. She coordinates Center Latinx at the DC LGBT Center, is a yoga student and aspiring teacher, and also works as a Spanish-English interpreter and translator. Lissette aims to cultivate affirming and accessible spaces of joy and healing wherever she is called.

Why did you start working at The DC Center?

I couldn’t pass up the opportunity to work at my local lgbtq center and coordinate Latinx-centered programming. I’m honored to work alongside dedicated staff and community members who have been organizing queer spaces in DC for decades.

What is your music anthem?

Currently anything Cardi B and Bad Bunny

What is your favorite part about the LGBTQ+ community?

Our joy, our ancestors’ fire (thank you Marsha and Sylvia), our dance parties, our resilience

What is your favorite spot in DC and what do you do there?

Any place that hasn’t been gentrified

What do you think the LGBTQ+ community needs to improve on?

Our internalized anti-Blackness, transphobia, ableism, and classism.

What is your favorite Queer movie?

Mosquita y Mari

What has been your favorite moment while working in The DC Center?

Any time my coworkers make me laugh

What clothing item is a staple in your wardrobe?

Does lipstick count?

What color would you paint the White House, given the chance?

Black sprinkled with glitter

Who do you most look up to in the queer community?

Black, Indigenous, and immigrant youth and elders

Interest Survey: Support Group for LGBTQ People of Color

Link: https://goo.gl/forms/ijfWRtO16wk63JFv1

The DC Center for the LGBT Community is considering starting a support group for LGBTQ people of color. The aim of this group is to support and address the issues that people of color in the LGBTQ communities may be struggling.

We are excited about this opportunity, and we hope you are, too! Please take a few minutes to answer the questions. Your responses will help us gauge general interest and help shape the structure of the support group.

Link: https://goo.gl/forms/ijfWRtO16wk63JFv1

If you have any questions or suggestions, please also feel free to email Ping, ping@thedccenter.org.

 

Photo credit: What’s Happening Tulsa

Meet Dr. Zelaika Hepworth Clarke

September 4,  Virgo

Dr. Clarke is a staff social worker at the Center. They provide counseling services for individuals, couples and groups. They also offer consulting and training services for the support groups held at the Center. They conduct social work assessment and check-ins for Center Global clients.

Dr. Clarke’s work is made possible with support from the Centerlink-Johnson Family Foundation Mental Health Initiative.

Why did you start working at The DC Center?

I am committed to serving communities that have historically been marginalized and face multiple oppressive forces. I specialize in human sexuality and gender diversity and am passionate about  improving the wellbeing for individuals, couples (& polycules), and families living their truth and loving despite heterosexism, homonegativitiy, patriarchy, bi-erasure, monosexism etc..

What is your  music anthem?

I enjoy listening to the radio as I like knowing that I am not the only one jamming to a specific song in the moment but sharing tunes with my community simultaneously.

What is your favorite part about the LGBTQ+ community?

I love the love. I love to see couples/lovers/polycules  love each other despite society telling them they should  not.

What is your favorite spot in DC and what do you do there?

I am still new to the area and have much to explore. I have been enjoying the aesthetic of the architecture and monuments as well as the river. I love watching planes fly by while overlooking the Potomac river at Gravelly Point Park.

What do you think the LGBTQ+ community needs to improve on?

There are still oppressive forces at work in the community. Eliminating racism, cissexism, monosexism, biphobia, transphobia etc both internally and within the community should be prioritized.  I would like to see more work on creating inclusive spaces and events. For example,  if bisexuals/pansexuals/omnisexuals/queer folks happen to have partner(s) of a different gender they can be excluded from some queer events. Also in spaces for all “women” or “men” it tends to leave out non-binary folks, genderqueers, two-spirit, intersex and people of trans experience. Dominant narratives of LGBT+ folks seem dominated by white cisgender mononormative representations; I would love to see more diverse representations of the community including in leadership positions.

What is your favorite Queer movie?

Some good ones that come to mind are: I am Not Your Negro, Stud Life, Pariah, Naz and Maalik, Blackbird, Still Black:A Portrait of Black Transman, 195 Lewis ….

What has been your favorite moment while working in The DC Center?

I love to transform people’s affect and inspire epiphanies, breakthroughs, and healing in my clients recovering from trauma committed to self-growth.

What clothing item is a staple in your wardrobe?

Stilettos and bowties – sometimes my femme or androgynous self likes to dress up.

What color would you paint the White House, given the chance?

I think it would be fun to feature different  artist’s  work be displayed (murals, mosaics, paintings etc.) on the outside every month.  

Who do you most look up to in the queer community?

I admire the queer people who inhabitat nations with compulsory heterosexuality and where laws deny their right(s) to love, safety and respect. There are still many areas where it is extremely dangerous for people to exist and live their truth. I admire those who risk death simply by being authentically themselves.  

 

Volunteers Wanted For Research Study

Sin Marrones, Sin Gays: Experiences of Stigma Among Gay Latino Men in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Region

Are you over the age of 18?  Do you identify as a gay Latino male?  I am interested in speaking with gay Latino men about their experiences with stereotyping.  The interview would last approximately an hour.  During the interview you would be asked to discuss your view of the gay and Latino communities, your experiences with discrimination because of being gay and/or Latino, and your experiences with religion, machismo, and familismo.  Participants will receive a $30 gift card in appreciation of completing the interview.

For further questions contact Trevor Rose, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, & Health Administration & Policy, at 410-598-2412 or roset2@umbc.edu 

This research is conducted under the direction of Dr. Sarah Chard, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, & Health Administration & Policy, at 410-455-3380 or schard@umbc.edu

Recruiting for TEAM Training Study (GW Cancer Center)

LGBT Cancer Project

TEAM (Together – Equitable – Accessible – Meaningful) Training Study

*en español abajo*

The TEAM education program aims to improve the productivity of patient-provider interactions to promote accessible, equitable and patient-centered care that results in better health outcomes for those impacted by cancer.

We are actively recruiting individuals for telephone interviews who have experienced a diagnosis of cancer, who identify as female, transgender, or genderqueer, and who identify as a:

  • Racial minority (e.g. African American, African Immigrant, Native American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, Asian American, Middle Eastern etc.)​
  • Ethnic minority (e.g. Hispani​​c/Latinx)​​
  • Sexual minority (e.g. Lesbian, Bisexual, Pansexual, etc.)​
  • R​eligious minority (e.g. Muslim, Jewish, Jehovah’s Witness, Buddhist, Hindu, Atheist, Agnostic, etc.​)
  • Resident of a rural area​

Our team at GW is conducting interviews in English and Spanish to inform the development of educational resources for health care providers. Call 202-823-3376 Monday-Saturday between 9am-9pm ET if you would like to participate or learn more! You will receive a $50 Amazon gift card if you complete the focus group.

 

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Ha recibido un diagnostico de cancer? Cuentenos su historia. Los investigadores del Centro de Cancer de la Universidad George Washington estan buscando personas para participar en una entrevista grupal que:

  • Tengan 18 años de edad o mas
  • Recibieron atencion medica por un diagnostico de cancer en Estados Unidos
  • Se identifican como mujeres, transgenero o genderqueer

 

Llamen al 202-823-3853 de lunes a sabado de 9am a 9pm ET si desea participar o conocer mas! Recibira una tarjeta de regalo de Amazon de $50 si completa la entrevista grupal. Vea el volante abajo para mas informacion.

 

 

Smithsonian and Library of Congress Present Asian American Literature Festival

Smithsonian and Library of Congress Present Asian American Literature Festival

Festival Features Performances and Workshops Honoring the Contributions of

Asian American Writing and Writers

The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center, the Library of Congress, the Phillips Collection and Dupont Underground will host the Asian American Literature Festival from Thursday to Saturday, July 27–29. Featuring more than 50 prominent Asian American poets, writers, literary scholars, graphic novelists, spoken-word artists and children’s literature authors, the festival will present an array of live performances, mentoring sessions and interactive workshops. The event will take place at the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery July 27 from 11:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.; at the Phillips Collection July 28 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; at Dupont Underground July 28 from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.; and at the Library of Congress July 29 from 11 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

“Asian American literature has always been a crucial space for writing hidden histories and building new communities,” said Lisa Sasaki, director of the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. “This festival is a chance to honor Asian American writing and writers and grow the next generation of literary trailblazers.”

Featured Programs

·         A two-day long participatory reading of Carlos Bulosan’s seminal 1946 novel America Is In the Heart

·         An animated adaptation of a chapter from Viet Thanh Nguyen’s forthcoming novel The Committed (sequel to Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Sympathizer) by artist Matt Huynh

·         National Book Award finalist Karen Tei Yamashita and Kimiko Hahn, president of the Poetry Society of America, will give intimate lectures on their personal journeys through Asian American literary history

·         LITERAOKE, a fun combination of literary reading and karaoke, with performances by Franny Choi, Tarfia Faizullah, Ed Lin and local Washington, D.C. poet Regie Cabico

·         Writer-scholar round-robin session for exchanging writing and scholarly interests and building new networks

·         The Asian American Literature Donation Project, which will provide donated works of Asian American literature to local spaces of need

A complete listing of participants and programs at the festival is available at the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center’s website.

Held in partnership with the Poetry Foundation, the Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center, Dupont Underground, the Phillips Collection, the Association for Asian American Studies, the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities and a host of Asian American arts organizations, this three-day event is the first national festival of its kind.

About Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center

Established in 1997, the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is a national resource for discovering the consequence and complexity of the Asian Pacific American experience through collaboration, exhibitions, programs, and digital experiences. Follow the Center on Twitter: @SmithsonianAPA.

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Literature Festival new (002)

DiCción Queer Announces DC Love – a Tribute: a Community Event to Commemorate the Casualties at Pulse Nightclub

DiCción Queer, in partnership with TRADE and Gays Against Guns DC, invites the community to the performance of DC Love – a Tribute: a Community Event to Commemorate the Casualties at Pulse Nightclub. The performance takes place at TRADE, 1410 14th Street, NW, on Monday, June 12th from 5:30 pm to 6:30 pm. and will include dramatic readings, solo dances and songs to commemorate the casualties and pay tribute to those who lost loved ones at the Pulse nightclub shooting one year ago.

The performance aspires to serve as a catalyst for an open discussion on gun violence and the LGBTQ+ community. At the end of the tribute, actors and audience will initiate a candlelight procession that will end at Dupont Circle, site of the Pride Fund’s Candle Light Vigil to End Gun Violence.

The community performance will happen with the support of Gays Against Guns,  Pride, and Colectivo de Artistas Latinx.

About DiCción Queer: DiCción Queer is a bilingual LGBTQ+ Latinx arts organization active in the Washington DC metropolitan area with the purpose of developing, nurturing, and supporting the Latinx LGBTQ+ arts. Check us out on Facebook at www.facebook.com/DiccionQueer/

DC Black Pride May 26 – May 29

Since 1991, DC Black Pride (DCBP) has been held annually during Memorial Day Weekend in our nation’s capital — Washington, D. C.

Year after year, more than 50,000 men and women from all over the world attend DCBP and experience the great culture and history of the Washington, DC area. Attendees have come to expect only quality social and non-social events.

DCBP is the inspiration for numerous annual Black LGBT pride events in the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, Brazil, Africa and the Caribbean since its founding.

DCBP looks forward to seeing you May 26 through 29 for DC Black Pride 2017. This year’s theme, The Ties that Bind: Twenty Seven Years of DC Black Pride, celebrates the strong bonds within the LGBT communitiy.

 

Please visit http://www.dcblackpride.org/schedule.htm  for more information on the workshops, parties, and community events!

See You There!!!

Latin American Youth Center’s Housing Programs

The Latin American Youth Center’s (LAYC‘s) Drop-In Center is a safe space for youth 24 years old and under, of any race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and gender identity to connect to safe housing resources.
Core services  include:
  • Housing for One Year
  • Intensive Case Management for educational, vocational, health and other needs
  • In-House Mental Health Counseling
  • Assistance finding jobs
  • Support in accessing public benefits
  • Food, laundry, showers, computers, diapers, clothing, and more
For more information, drop by 3045 15th Street NW, Washington, DC, Monday through Friday between 10am and 6pm, or call (202) 713-0475.

What have your experiences been with the Metropolitan Police Department?

Metropolitan Police Department Community Engagement Surveye
Metropolitan Police Department Community Engagement Surveye
Metropolitan Police Department Community Engagement Surveye

The DC Anti-Violence Project, a program of the DC Center for the LGBT Community, has been invited to sit on a community policing panel organized by the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD). We want to hear from YOU about your experiences with the MPD.

This survey is completely anonymous. Thank you for your help!  To begin the survey, simply follow the link below:

Take the survey now.