You Matter, Get Counted !

September 30 is the last day to take the US Census.

WAYS TO PARTICIPATE

The Census can be taken online or over the phone in 13 languages, including English, Arabic, French and Spanish.

Online: To take the Census online visit https://my2020census.gov
Phone: To take the Census over the phone, clients should call the appropriate number here: https://2020census.gov/en/contact-us.html

 

Facts about taking the 2020 Census

 

Does the 2020 Census ask about citizenship status?

NO. The 2020 Census does not ask whether you or anyone in your home is a U.S. citizen.

 

Are non-citizens counted in the census?

YES. Everyone counts. The 2020 Census counts everyone living in the country, including non-citizens. Learn more about who should be counted when you complete the 2020 Census.

 

Can my answers be shared with law enforcement or used against me?

NO. The law prevents the Census Bureau from sharing your information with law enforcement. Your answers cannot be used to impact your eligibility for government benefits. Your answers are only used to create statistics about our country. The Census Bureau is bound by Title 13 of the U.S. Code to protect your personal information and keep it strictly confidential. That’s every answer, to every question.

 

Can I only take the census online?

NO. The 2020 Census will be available online, by phone, and by mail. Online and phone responses can be completed in 13 languages (English, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, Russian, Arabic, Tagalog, Polish, French, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, and Japanese). A paper form will be mailed to every house that hasn’t responded already when we send our fourth mail piece out.

 

What questions WILL NOT be asked by the Census Bureau?

During the 2020 Census, the Census Bureau will never ask you for:

Your Social Security number.
Money or donations.
Anything on behalf of a political party.
Your bank or credit card account numbers.

Get counted, click on the links below:
Online: To take the Census online visit https://my2020census.gov
Phone: To take the Census over the phone, clients should call the appropriate number here: https://2020census.gov/en/contact-us.html

COVID-19 State of Emergency: Tenant Rights & Resources – DC

COVID-19 State of Emergency: Tenant Rights & Resources

The purpose of this document is to assist District renters in understanding their rights and
available resources during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (“Emergency”) declared by
Mayor Muriel Bowser. Mayor Bowser has extended the Emergency to Friday, October 9, 2020.
1
The D.C. Office of the Tenant Advocate (OTA) has suspended its regular walk-in hours, Mondays
through Thursdays, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, for the duration of the Emergency. We are otherwise
committed to providing our full range of services.

 

I. OTA Telecommute Services
a. Legal Branch: Tenants needing legal services should contact OTA’s hotline. Either:
i. Go online to https://ota.dc.gov/; click on “OTA Housing Assistance” and
“Community Service”; click on “Ask the Director” and complete the request; and
then click “Submit”; or
ii. Call 202-719-6560 and leave a message.

b. Policy Branch: Tenants who have requests or questions regarding policy matters should
send an email to Legislative Director Joel Cohn at Joel.Cohn@dc.gov.

c. Outreach and Education Branch: Tenants who have requests or questions regarding
education and outreach services should send an email to Education and Outreach
Coordinator Stephen Dudek at Stephen.Dudek@dc.gov. Mr. Dudek is conducting virtual
trainings during the Emergency.

d. Emergency Housing Assistance: OTA will respond to displacements in collaboration with
the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA), DC Homeland Security
(HSEMA), or the American Red Cross.

 

II. Tenant rights & protections during the Emergency2
a. Rent Increase Freeze & Rent Collection

i. Rent increase freeze:
1. Rent increases during the Emergency are prohibited. This applies to rent
controlled and non-rent controlled units alike.

2. Any rent increase notice that was issued during the Emergency, or that
was to take effect during the Emergency, is null and void. The landlord
must issue a new 30-day notice when the Emergency ends.

3. Any rent increase notice that was issued before the Emergency, but that
was to take effect after the Emergency, is also null and void. The landlord
must issue a new 30-day notice when the Emergency ends.

 

ii. Tenant duty to pay frozen rent amount: The laws governing tenant’s duty to
pay rent, other than rent increases, have not changed.

1. Except as explained in item (iv) below, the tenant is still obligated to pay
rent in the amount charged just prior to the start of the emergency.
2. In the event of financial hardship, the tenant should notify the housing
provider and ask for an alternative payment plan. Any such plan should
be put in writing and should be achievable.

iii. Mortgage relief:

1. A mortgage lender must create a mortgage deferment program.
2. Lenders must report approved applications to the D.C. Department of
Insurance Securities and Banking (DISB) on or before June 4th and then
every 15 days thereafter.

3. DISB must publish a list of approved applications.
4. An owner who qualifies for a mortgage deferral must notify all tenants
within 5 days of the availability of a rent payment plan (see below).

iv. Rent Payment Plans:

1. Landlords must develop a rent payment plan and make it available to
tenants during the Emergency and for one year thereafter.
2. The plan must cover all rent due during the Emergency, and for up to one
year thereafter, so long as the tenant remains a tenant.
3. The landlord must also include in the rent payment plan any amenity fee
or other fee that is a part of the lease.
4. To be eligible, a tenant must demonstrate to the landlord that the
Emergency caused the tenant a direct or indirect financial hardship.
5. Rent payment plans must have a minimum term length of one year,
unless the tenant requests a shorter term.
6. Any repayment of the deferred rent amount shall be made in equal
monthly installments, unless the tenant requests otherwise.
7. The tenant cannot lose any rights under the lease by entering into a
payment plan.
8. Landlords must establish an application procedure, and must accept
applications by telephone and online; the landlord cannot deny an
application that includes certain supporting documentation.

9. The tenant may file a complaint with the Rent Administrator if the
landlord denies their application for a rent payment plan.
10. The landlord is not allowed to report to credit bureaus any delinquency
arising from the tenant’s participation in a payment plan.

v. Form of payment:

The laws governing the form of rent payments have not changed.
1. If the lease requires the tenant to pay by money order or in a fashion that
requires the tenant to leave their home, the tenant may contact the
housing provider to discuss alternative payment options.
2. Alternative options may include paying rent online via a wire transfer or
an app such as Venmo, PayPal, Zelle, or otherwise.
3. The agreement should be in writing, and it should specify the period of
time during which the agreed upon options are available to the tenant
(likely at least until the Emergency ends).

b. Evictions

i. Landlords are prohibited from evicting any tenant during the Emergency.
ii. Landlords are prohibited from filing an eviction complaint during the Emergency and for 60 days thereafter.
iii. Landlords are prohibited from serving eviction summonses during the Emergency.
iv. Landlord cannot evict a tenant without a Court order; following the Emergency,landlord must schedule the eviction anew, and then provide tenant with 21 days’ notice of the eviction date.

c. Utility Services & Late Fees

i. Utility companies (electric, gas, water, cable, and telecommunications) are
prohibited from disconnecting services during the state of emergency and for 15
days following the end of the emergency.
ii. Please note, cable and telecommunications companies may reduce services due
to the nonpayment of a bill, so long as they maintain a basic level of service.
iii. Housing providers are prohibited from charging a late fee during the emergency.
A fee for late payment of rent due March 1st remains valid, if the grace period
expired before the start of the Emergency on March 11th.
.

d. Utility Payment Plans

i. A utility provider (gas, electric, DC Water, telecommunications, cable) must offer
a payment plan for eligible customers for amounts that come due during the
program period.

ii. The “program period” is the PHE plus:
1. 60 days for a cable or telecommunications operator not regulated by the Public Service Commission.

2. Six months for any other utility provider.
iii. To be eligible, a customer must notify the provider of an inability to pay all or a
portion of the amount due as a result of the public health emergency.
iv. During the PHE, a utility provider regulated by the Public Service Commission
shall reconnect service to occupied residential property upon customer request and not charge a fee for this reconnection.

 

e. Deadlines for the exercise of tenant and tenant association rights

i. All deadlines for the exercise of tenant and tenant association rights under both
the Rental Housing Act of 1985 and the Rental Housing Conversion and Sale Act
of 1980 (including TOPA) have been extended.
ii. Specifically, any such deadline is tolled – or paused – until the end of the Emergency plus an additional 30 days.
iii. Example:
1. Tenants in a building with 5 or more units receive an offer of sale on
March 1, 2020, from the housing provider.
2. Under the law, they have 45 days, or until April 15, 2020, to create a
tenant association and submit to the landlord a letter of interest in purchasing the building.
3. On March 11, 2020, the Mayor declares a state of emergency.
4. When the Mayor lifts the state of emergency, the tenants will have a
total of 65 days (45 – 10 + 30) to respond to the offer of sale.

f. Tenant Notices of Intent to Vacate

i. The tenant may elect to toll or pause a Notice of Intent to Vacate submitted to
the landlord prior to the Emergency for the Emergency’s duration.
ii. When the Emergency ends, the tenant will have exactly the same number of
days remaining to vacate unit as they had before the Emergency started.
iii. The tenant will not be deemed to be a “holdover tenant,” one who fails to
vacate by the date promised. This is important because under DC law, a
holdover tenant can be evicted and is liable for double the rent.

g. Landlord access to rental units

i. The laws governing landlord access to a rental unit have not been specifically
changed. The landlord could be within their rights to enter the unit to conduct
repairs, inspections, to show the unit to a prospective purchaser, etc.

ii. The tenant should be aware of the existing law. Except in the case of an
emergency situation in the building, the landlord must provide the tenant with:
1. A 48-hour written notice (a text message or email suffices); AND
2. Can only access the unit Monday through Saturday, between 9 am and 5
pm, except for District holidays, unless the tenant agrees otherwise.

iii. Regarding concerns about spreading the COVID-19 virus, the tenant may request
that the landlord defer non-essential work until after the emergency, and inquire
about the health and safety precautions being taken. All parties should:
1. Practice social distancing;
   2. Wear protective gear (masks and gloves) as appropriate;
3. Make sure that the apartment is cleaned / disinfected after visitors leave;
4. Wash hands with soap and hot water for 20 seconds.

 

h. Cleaning of Common Areas

i. Landlord must clean common areas on a regular basis, including surfaces that
are regularly touched, such as doors, railings, seating, and the exterior of mailboxes.

i. Requirement of Masks in Residential Buildings

i. All “essential businesses”—including residences and residential facilities—must
ensure employees, contractors, and visitors wear a face mask and honor social distancing upon entering the building.
ii. Essential businesses are required to post signage at their entrances instructing all
employees, contractors, customers, guests and visitors to:
1. Wear a mask or face covering;
2. Maintain six (6) feet of distance from each other person who is not part of their household;
3. Cough and sneeze away from people and into one’s elbow or shirt; and
4. Not shake hands or engage in any other unnecessary physical contact.
iii. Individuals must wear a mask in the common areas of apartments, condominiums and cooperatives.
iv. Individuals may report violations of the Mayor’s order for not wearing masks to
the Office of the Attorney General. Individuals found in violation of the Mayor’s
order may be subject to fines up to $1,000 per violation.

 

j. Amenity Fee Refunds at rent controlled units

i. Where the tenant pays an amenity fee in addition to the rent, and where the
amenity is made temporarily unavailable as is consistent with an Emergency order, the landlord must provide a pro rata refund of the fee.
ii. Where a service or facility fee is lawfully included in the rent charged, and the service or facility is made temporarily unavailable as is consistent with an Emergency order, the landlord does not have to reduce the rent charged.

 

III. Tenant Associations (TA)

a. A TA should heed the COVID-19 Emergency orders and recommendations of District
government and the Center for Disease Control, including not hosting in-person
meetings involving social gathering.
b. If a TA needs to hold a special meeting, it should explore and execute an online option.
c. If a TA needs to hold a vote during the emergency, the TA should consider amending the
bylaws to permit electronic, online, or virtual voting as appropriate.
d. If you have relevant questions or concerns, contact OTA’s Education and Outreach
Coordinator Stephen Dudek at Stephen.Dudek@dc.gov.

IV. Court Procedures

a. D.C. Superior Court: Evictions
i. As of June 24, 2020, all trials including at Landlord & Tenant Court scheduled on or before August 14, 2020, are continued.
ii. All evictions of tenants and foreclosed homeowners on or before August 14, 2020, are stayed. This applies to tenancies under both oral and written leases.
iii. The landlord may not file an eviction action in court until 60 days following the end of the Emergency.

b. D.C. Superior Court: Other actions & emergencies
i. All Small Claims Court and Housing Conditions Calendars are continued pending further notice from the Court.
ii. In the event of an emergency need for court action – including at Housing Conditions Calendar — tenants can file emergency motions and applications for waiver of prepayment of cost (Fee Waiver Applications) by emailing these
documents to Civilefiling@dcsc.gov.
iii. Tenants should NOT go to the Moultrie Court House to file emergency motions.

c. D.C. Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH)
i. OAH is operating on a modified schedule at least until October 9, 2020.
ii. All hearings, except emergency hearings as designated by the Mayor, are canceled through October 9, 2020.
iii. OAH will notify the litigants of their new hearing date.
iv. Until further notice, all hearings will be conducted by telephone.
v. If you cannot participate in a hearing by telephone or do not want to, you must advise OAH. OAH will reschedule your hearing to a time when in-person hearings
are authorized to resume.
vi. Please, communicate with OAH electronically, by emailing OAH at
oah.filing@dc.gov, or call 202-442-9094.

 

 

 

 

 

This document was sourced from https://ota.dc.gov/

Survivor ArtMake: PAIN. REBELLION. PRIDE. A Triptych

LGBTQ+ folx are survivors of all kinds of violence, trauma and abuse. Expression through art is healing and powerful.

The DC Anti-Violence Project is offering a virtual gathering for you to create a piece that shows your journey. Using collage, you will explore and create a triptych (three panels) to represent a way you have turned a painful event into a resilient strength that you bring to the planet.

Read more…

 

Pride 2020 Community Calendar

Pride looks different this year, but Pride cannot be cancelled. We’ve compiled a list of community events happening in the coming weeks to help you stay connected to the LGBTQ+ community. Have an event you want added to the calendar? Email rebecca@thedccenter.org 

June 4
Out LGBTQ Dog Mushers In Alaska Share Stories & Answer Questions at 8:00 pm
FREE! Brought to you by Pride Outside

Blade Pride Chats Presented By The Ariadne Getty Foundation at 4:00 pm
Topic: Celebrate Your First Pride & Coming Out
FREE! Brought to you by Washington Blade, Blade Foundation and Los Angeles Blade

June 6
Virtual Dance Party 5.0 – PRIDE Night at 8:30 pm
Registration required; Pay what you can – minimum $1 donation!
Brought to you by Scorpio Entertainment

June 8
PRIDE Talks at 8:00 pm
FREE! Brought to you by Capital Pride Alliance

PRIDE Week Trivia at 8:00 pm
Tickets required >> $10
Brought to you by NoMa Business Improvement District, DC Beer and Red Bear Brewing

June 9
Second Tuesday Queer Trivia at 7:00 pm
FREE! >>> But please consider supporting the staff of A League Of Her Own & Pitchers DC
Brought to you by A League of Her Own

Story District’s Out/Spoken at 7:30 pm >>> POSTPONED
Registration required; Pay what you can!
Brought to you by Story District

June 10
DCPS Parent University: Loving with Pride at 2:30 pm
FREE! >> Registration required
Brought to you by DC Public Schools 

Outloud: Raising Voices – DC Episode at 8:00 pm
FREE! Brought to you by JJLA

June 11
Blade Pride Chats Presented By The Ariadne Getty Foundation at 4:00 pm
Topic: Pride in Business
FREE! Brought to you by Washington Blade, Blade Foundation and Los Angeles Blade

June 12
National Pride Shabbat at 7:00 pm
FREE! Brought to you by 6th & I; RSVP appreciated

June 13
DC Pride2020 March + Caravan at 2:30 pm
FREE! Brought to you by No Justice No Pride

TRADE Virtual Pride Show at 9:00 pm
FREE! Tips to the performers encouraged.
Brought to you by TRADE

June 14
Pride Yoga
FREE! Brought to you by Capital Pride Alliance

June 15
Pride Talks: Defund MPD – Educational Forum
FREE! Registration required. Brought to you by a coalition of DC LGBTQ+ organizations

June 17
La Plática – DC Latinx Pride 2020
FREE! Brought to you by the Latinx History Project

June 18
Blade Pride Chats Presented By The Ariadne Getty Foundation at 4:00 pm
Topic: Reflections of Pride
FREE! Brought to you by Washington Blade, Blade Foundation and Los Angeles Blade

Smut Slam DC: Queer Pride Online at 8:00 pm
Tickets required >> Pay what you can – $10 suggested donation
Brought to you by Smut Slam – International and Smut Slam DC

June 19
Virtual Pride Shabbat
FREE! Brought to you by GLOE, Bet Mishpachach, Nice Jewish Boys and Nice Jewish Girls

June 19 – June 22
Reel Affirmations XTRA Films On Demand Presents: Irving Park
Irving Park is the story of four gay men in their 60s, living together in Chicago, and exploring an unconventional lifestyle of master/slave relationships. A family based on free choice and the consent to lose one’s personal freedom in favor of the desire of the Other.
$12 Virtual Ticket >> Brought to you by the DC Center’s Reel Affirmations

June 20
Proud Memories – Preserving the Legacy of DC’s LGBTQ+ Community at 1:00 pm
FREE! Brought to you by DC Public Libraries

National Pride Inside at 6:00 pm
Registration required >> Donations encouraged!
Brought to you by the Victory Fund

June 25
SMYAL for Summer
$25 suggested donation; Brought to you by SMYAL

June 26
Blade Pride Chats Presented By The Ariadne Getty Foundation at 4:00 pm
Topic: Global Pride Preview
FREE! Brought to you by Washington Blade, Blade Foundation and Los Angeles Blade

June 26
14th DC Latinx Pride Official Dance Party: La Fiesta En Casa
FREE! Brought to you by the Latinx History Project

June 26 – June 29
Reel Affirmations XTRA Films On Demand Presents: Breaking Fast
Mo, a practicing Muslim living in West Hollywood, is learning to navigate life post heartbreak. Enter Kal, an All-American guy who surprises Mo by offering to break fast with him during the holy month of Ramadan. As they learn more about each other, they fall in love over what they have in common and what they don’t.
$12 Virtual Ticket >> Brought to you by the DC Center’s Reel Affirmations

June 27
Global Pride 2020

June 28
FB Live DC Center Drag Brunch Fundraiser at 12:00 pm
FREE! Tips to performers and donation to the Center encouraged!
Brought to you by the DC Center & Capital Pride Alliance

Capital Pride in the City – #StillWe Entertain at 7:00 pm
FREE! Brought to You By Capital Pride Alliance

Throughout the month:

The DC Center Center Arts Virtual Gallery
The Virtual Art Gallery of Mixed Media Muralist Laya Monarez’ Work.
Laya Monarez is a 36 year old bisexual transgender latinx artist based out of Washington DC.
FREE! Brought to you by The DC Center’s Center Arts Gallery

MoCo Pride Center #PostYourPride Challenges

Have an event you want added to the calendar? Email rebecca@thedccenter.org 

The DC Center Stands in Solidarity with the BLM Movement

As we begin Pride Month this year, we have been confronted with multiple visible acts of violence and police brutality, caused by the widespread systems of white supremacy and racism in our country. That is why The DC Center for the LGBT Community joined together with over 500 LGBTQ+ and civil rights organizations across the country to stand in solidarity with our Black siblings and reaffirm that Black Lives Matter. We also recognize that speaking up alone is not enough. The DC Center recommits to challenging and confronting anti-Blackness, and to working to be more intentionally anti-racist in our work. We cannot forget that the first Pride was an uprising against policy brutality and harassment led by Black and Brown trans and butch women. Intersectionality is critical to our movement – none of us have justice until we all do. 

In Solidarity,

The DC Center Board of Directors

 

You can read the full letter and see all the organizations who have signed on here.

 

Meet the Staff: Michael

Welcome Michael to the DC Center! As a development intern, he looks forward to getting to know the ins and outs of non-profit management! You can meet Michael at the DC Center on weekdays and some evenings. He is looking forward to helping serve and provide assistance to the DC LGBTQ+ community! 

 

Birthdate, Astro Sign

July 29, 1999, Leo but I’m Virgo rising with an Aquarius moon… I know it’s so chaotic.

 

Where are you originally from? 

Originally from Fanwood, New Jersey

 

Why did you start working at the DC Center? 

I wanted to explore more about non-profit management and development specifically in the D.C. area, also I wanted to help serve my community! 

 

What has been your favorite part about working at the DC Center?

How down to earth and genuine the staff is at the Center!

 

What is your music anthem? 

Perfect Places by Lorde because I love to travel and the song brings me back to riding the train through the Swiss Alps last summer. 

 

What is your favorite part about the LGBTQ+ community? 

The diversity and how the community encourages individualistic expression!

 

What is your favorite queer movie?  

Definitely Call Me By Your Name, the filming locations are beyond serene. 

 

What color would you paint the White House, given the chance?  

Well since I am a student at Syracuse University I would obviously have to paint the White House orange! Go ‘Cuse! 

 

Who do you look up to in the queer community?

Marsha P. Johnson, who was an outspoken advocate in the gay liberation movement. 

 

OutWrite 2020 Chapbook Competition

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
May 5, 2020
MEDIA CONTACTS:
dave ring, OutWrite Chair
outwritedc@gmail.com

 

Submissions Opening for OutWrite’s 2020 Chapbook Competition

WASHINGTON, D.C. — OutWrite is pleased to announce its second Chapbook Competition, running from May 5th to June 5th, 2020.  The winning chapbooks will be celebrated at the 2020 OutWrite LGBTQ Literary Festival. Submission details are included at the end of this text.

Each winner will receive 25 copies of their winning chapbook, an offer of print publication from Neon Hemlock Press, and an opportunity to read from their work at OutWrite 2020 on Sunday, August 2nd.

Winning chapbooks will be selected in three categories by the competition judges:

Nonfiction: Tyrese Coleman
Tyrese L. Coleman is a writer, wife, mother, and attorney. Her debut collection of stories and essays, How to Sit, was published by Mason Jar Press in 2018 and nominated for a 2019 PEN Open Book Award. Her work has appeared as a notable in Best American Essays 2018 and 2016 and nominated for a Pushcart Prize.

Fiction: Rivers Solomon 
Rivers Solomon writes about life in the margins, where they are much at home. Their debut novel, An Unkindness of Ghosts, was a finalist for a Hurston/Wright and Lambda award and appeared on the Stonewall Honor List. Their novella, The Deep, has been nominated for a Hugo and Nebula. Solomon’s next book is forthcoming 2021 from MCD books.

Poetry: Faylita Hicks
Faylita Hicks (pronouns: she/her/they) is a Black queer writer and the Editor of Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review. She is a 2019 Lambda Literary Fellow, a 2019 Jack Jones Literary Arts “Culture, Too” Fellow, and a 2020 Right of Return Fellow. She was a finalist in the 2018 PEN America Writing for Justice Fellowship, the 2018 Cosmonauts Avenue Annual Poetry Prize and Palette Poetry’s 2019 Spotlight Award. Her collection HoodWitch (Acre Books, 2019) is a finalist for the 2020 Lambda Literary Annual Award and is now available.

There is no fee to enter this year’s contest.

Notes on each category:

  • In nonfiction, we are looking for work from DMV-based writers.  All submissions should be from writers with a connection to the DC/Maryland/Virginia area.  Our judge is particularly interested in hybrid work, so we have some genre flexibility in that regard.
  • In fiction, our judge is particularly interested in noir, speculative fiction, trope-subversion, and/or anarchist fiction.
  • In poetry, we have no additional notes or restrictions.

Please follow these guidelines in preparing your submission:

  • Chapbooks may be submitted in three categories:  fiction, nonfiction & poetry.
  • We will accept submissions in all three categories in English.
  • OutWrite is a celebration of LGBTQ literature; entries that explore aspects of LGBTQ culture or identity are encouraged.
  • Thematically-linked works are encouraged, but not required. There are no limitations regarding genre.
  • Manuscripts should be no shorter than 20 pages and no longer than 40 pages. This does not include the table of contents or title page.
  • Submissions are open from May 5th to June 5th 2020.
  • Each writer may only submit one entry per category.
  • Your manuscript should be in a standard font, size 12. Please single-space poetry and double-space prose/nonfiction. Please include a title page and a table of contents; do not include an acknowledgements page (winning entries will be given the opportunity to adjust front and back matter before publication).
  • The collection as a whole must be unpublished, but individual poems/stories/essays may be previously published (as long as relevant rights have reverted)
  • We will be accepting simultaneously submitted work. All semi-finalists will be required to remove their work from simultaneous review upon notification.
  • We expect to announce the semifinalists in late June.  Winners will be announced in July. Publication will be in August.

Entries must be submitted no earlier than May 5th, 2020 and no later than June 5th, 2020. The submission window closes at 11:59pm EST on the 5th.

Submit all entries via this submission form.  Queries can be made to  outwritecontest@gmail.com. If the form is inaccessible to you for any reason, please email your submission to the email above with all of the information requested by the form.

Any updates to these guidelines will be posted here.

About OutWrite
OutWrite is a celebration of LGBT literature, held annually the first weekend in August in Washington, D.C. The 20120 festival will kick off on Friday, July 31. On Saturday, August 1st, there will be a full day of readings, panels, book sales, and exhibitors. To finish the weekend, a number of writing workshops will be held on Sunday, August 2nd.  For more information, visit: thedccenter.org/outwrite.

About Neon Hemlock Press
Neon Hemlock is a purveyor of queer chapbooks and speculative fiction based in Washington, DC.  More information at www.neonhemlock.com.

About the DC Center
The DC Center for the LGBT Community educates, empowers, celebrates, and connects the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities. To fulfill our mission, we focus on four core areas: health and wellness, arts & culture, social & support services, and advocacy and community building. We envision communities where LGBT people feel healthy, safe, and affirmed.

Updates from the DC Center

The DC Center continues to bring essential services to the LGBTQ+ community during this challenging time. We have paused our Executive Director search given the current situation, but our phenomenal staff have continued to step up to ensure the Center is thriving! While our building remains closed, we are very much open and here to serve you.

So what’s been happening at the Center lately?

  • Many of our social, peer and support groups have been meeting via video chat including Center Aging, Job Club, Center GenderQueer, Center Trans, Women in their Twenties & Thirties, LGBTQ People of Color, the DC Antiviolence Project, and more! Visit our calendar for a complete list of upcoming virtual events>>.

  • Center Arts is finding creative ways to bring cinematic LGBTQ Lifestories to your home. Reel Affirmations: Washington DC’s International LGBTQ Film Festival and Monthly Film Series will continue with a virtual film screening THIS Friday, April 24th. Get your tickets now! 
  • Be on the lookout for our launch of our Virtual Center Arts Gallery where you can check out our current artist’s video message and view and purchase her work.

  • Unfortunately, Gay Day at the Zoo has been canceled, but you can still spend some time with the pandas, cheetahs, elephants, lions or naked mole rats via the zoo cam.

  • Our blog continues to have helpful COVID-19 related resources! Read about legal rights, unemployment support and more here.

  • Our support desk is still open! You can email us at  supportdesk@thedccenter.org or call 202-682-2245. Is there anything else we can do to help you during this challenging time? Let us know!

Expansion of Unemployment Insurance Benefits under the New CARES Act

The federal government recently passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act),
which includes an expansion of unemployment insurance benefits for District of Columbia workers.
While the CARES Act was signed into law by the President on March 27, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor
is still in the process of releasing corresponding guidance to provide states with operating, financial and
reporting instructions specific to the CARES Act of 2020 through the issuance of a series of Unemployment
Insurance Program Letters (UIPLs). Like most other states, the District’s Unemployment Insurance system is
currently being updated to enable processing of the new CARES Act programs.
A summary of the expanded unemployment insurance programs offered through the provisions of the CARES
Act is provided in the link below:

Expansion of Unemployment Insurance Benefits under the New CARES Act

 

“The DC Centers Community Engagement team is here to help you with any questions. Contact:  supportdesk@thedccenter.org

Center Global Asylees Face Extraordinary Pandemic Threats

#queertranscaravan

Greetings,

Center Global participants live in a tenuous job, housing, and healthcare context. They are largely unqualified for federal supports during COVID-19, placing them in greater danger and despair.

Many have lost well-earned jobs and under increasing pressures to pay rent and living expenses as their work hours and job options evaporate in this pandemic economy.

On March 28th, Center Global and the DC Center launched the COVID-19 Emergency Support Program. We created it to a) establish a fund to assist with COVID-19-related expenses and b) reach out and check on our participants’ wellbeing. 

In less than a week, we received 25 applications with requests of over $16K for help with rent, medical expenses, food, and transportation.

We’ve been able to support approximately 60% of our immediate requests, realizing more will arrive as the virus’s impacts spread. Experts warn DC will be the next virus hot spot.

Now’s your chance to help!

Through our generous supporters and volunteers, we’ve been fortunate to cover some of our participants’ needs—yet there’s an urgent need to close the financial gap.

Online or By Mail

We welcome your contributions to the COVID-19 Support Fund. You can make a tax-deductible contribution by visiting https://donorbox.org/centerglobalOr you can send a check to: Center Global, 2000 14th St., NW., Suite 105, Washington, DC  20009 (please write “Center Global COVID-19” in the memo line).

 

With your help, we can guide our participants through this pandemic. To learn more about Center Global’s COVID-19 response, please email Geoffrey Louden, vice chair at geoffreyl@thedccenter.org.

 

Thank you and best wishes for your health and safety.

Tom Sommers, Geoffrey Louden, Don Driver

Executive Leadership Committee


Tom Sommers                                                                 Geoffrey Louden