Introducing Lydia!

Welcome Lydia Turner-Little to the DC Center! Lydia will be our development intern for the fall and will be working with our professional partners and donors. She is looking forward to planning new and exciting fundraising events. You can meet Lydia at the DC Center on most weekdays and some evenings. She is looking forward to meeting and forming connections with members of the local community! 

Birthdate, Astro Sign

October 3- Libra

Where are you originally from? 

Damascus, Maryland but I go to school in southwestern Virginia 

Why did you start working at the DC Center? 

I started working at the DC Center because I wanted to be able to do work that directly helps the LGBTQ+ community. 

What has been your favorite part about working at the DC Center?

My favorite part has been interacting with others because everyone here is so friendly! I also love how I am allowed to be creative. How many other jobs do you get to spend time thinking about drag shows and it be considered on task?

What is your music anthem? 

My go-to is usually whatever song Lil Nas X has most recently released, but I like all types of music from Motown to 80’s power ballads to musical theater to rap and, yes, even some country

What is your favorite part about the LGBTQ+ community? 

My favorite part is the sense of community and how when I’m interacting with other LGBTQ+ folks there tends to be a stronger connection right off the bat. It’s also easier to talk about my own experiences with other LGBTQ+ folks and I appreciate feeling that same trust from others. 

What is your favorite spot in DC and what do you do there? 

Being from Maryland, I’ve been a Washington Nationals fan since I was young so I would have to say that my favorite spot is Nats Park. Going to a baseball game in person is so much fun and even people who aren’t baseball fans can have a good time. 

What is your favorite queer movie?  

I was super excited for this question because the movies I watch are almost exclusively queer-themed, but my all-time favorite is a tie between Pride (2014) and Maurice (1987). Pride is about the real-life group of gay and lesbian activists who supported the striking miners in Wales in 1984 and the unlikely relationship that formed between the two groups. Maurice is based on the novel by E. M. Forster and tells the story of a gay man coming to accept his sexuality and the relationships he forms with others. The movie also features young Hugh Grant which I find to be a very compelling selling point.

What color would you paint the White House, given the chance?  

I would have some very smart scientist invent a paint that makes things clear and paint that on the White House. Some may call it a security risk, but I call it a way to fix the lack of transparency in DC.

Who do you look up to in the queer community?

Dr. Jamison Green is an activist based in California who has been fighting for the rights of trans* people for decades. He was an integral part of bringing about legal changes that make it easier for anyone to obtain a legal name change, and he currently works to help workplaces create better environments for LGBTQ+ employees. He was kind enough to let me interview him for a school project several years ago and I am forever grateful to him and in awe of all of the challenges he has overcome. 

Intergenerational Hangout (Virtual)

A Zoom event by The DC Center for the LGBT Community and the DC Department on Aging and Community Living (DACL)

Join us on Saturday, July 31st from 1pm – 3pm ET for a special Zoom event brought to you by The DC Center’s seniors program (Center Aging) and DACL. Join us in discussion between LGBT older adults and LGBT younger adults as we chat about everything and anything in the hopes of building bridges between generations and providing some laughs along the way! For more information please reach out to adamheller@thedccenter.org. We hope to see you there!

 

To register for this event, click HERE

 

Additionally, we would like to send $50 Uber Eats gift cards to a limited number of attendees (via the registration link above) to help folks enjoy the event. To qualify for a gift card, you must be a senior (60+) and DC resident.

 

DC LGBTQ+ Budget Coalition

DC LGBTQ+ Budget Coalition

The DC Center is proud to be a part of the DC LGBTQ+ Budget Coalition. Being led by LGBTQ+ providers and leaders, the coalition is made up of representatives from LGBTQ+ and ally organizations to put pressure on Mayor Bowser and Chairman Mendelson in including LGBTQ+ issues into the 2022 budget. By ensuring that LGBTQ+ issues are a funding priority, it will allow for the expansion and protection of vital resources for the community in the D.C. area.

2020 was an incredibly difficult year. Many people in the LGBTQ+ community experienced financial disruption, housing insecurity, and an overall loss of community. Our community also experiences higher rates of poverty and food insecurity than the general population. As LGBTQ+ households – especially those headed by Black and Latinx LGBTQ+ people – continue to be disproportionately harmed by the pandemic, additional relief is necessary to support basic necessities for LGBTQ+ people and their families.

The coalition has four major areas of focus: Housing, LGBTQ+ Community Advocates & Coordinators, LGBTQ+ Resource & Community Center, and Commitment to Transgender/GNC Workforce. By focusing on housing, the coalition hopes to expand resources for LGBTQ+ people, particularly victims of domestic violence, Transgender/GNC folks, and seniors, by creating sustainable and permanent housing options. The LGBTQ+ Community Advocates & Coordinators section deals with allocating funds to realize the benefits of planned but not yet implemented programs and unfilled positions. The coalition also hopes to put into place a plan for a LGBTQ+ community center to ensure local LGBTQ+ organizations are in a central and accessible area. Lastly, the coalition requests to expand the Transgender/GNC workforce grant program for individuals over the age of 24 to aid those experiencing employment discrimination. Given the COVID-19 pandemic, it is crucial that we place pressure on politicians to ensure the needs of our community are met.

We ask for people to join The DC Center and other LGBTQ+ organizations in securing these budget requests. For more information on the coalition and to learn ways you can support, visit: https://sites.google.com/view/dclgbtqbudget/home

Statement from the DC Center regarding Nellie’s

The DC Center for the LGBT Community condemns Nellie’s actions during Pride Weekend. The security staff’s violent treatment of Keisha Young was unacceptable. We know that LGBTQ+ liberation is connected to Black liberation and we will continue to support and stand in community with Black and Brown organizers. The DC Center demands that Nellie’s take reparative action for this and prior harm caused to the community.

 

 

Capital Pride Celebration Washington DC

IT’S TIME TO CELEBRATE. 

#StillWe continues be a powerful statement about the resilience, struggles, celebrations, and pride that exist within our community. In a year like no other, still, we came together to educate, advocate for change, uplift marginalized voices, and support our neighbors.  

As it becomes safer for us to come together once again, we hope that you will join the Capital Pride Alliance in 2021, as we celebrate our community and continue the important work that we’ve committed ourselves to. Whether you plan on celebrating virtually or in person, our upcoming events provide safe and creative ways to honor our local traditions while taking into account varying levels of personal comfortThere are many ways to celebrate Pride in Washington, DC!

 

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE OFFICIAL DC PRIDE WEBSITE

Job Opening at the DC Center : Community Engagement Specialist

Job Type

Full-time
Number of hires for this role – 1

Qualifications

    • Associate (Preferred)

    • Spanish (Preferred)

Full Job Description

The qualified individual will be responsible for the following:

  • Collect and enter data from focus populations in respective systems (Careware, Link U)
  • Engage groups and individual in sexual health education and planning sessions
  • Provide referrals to eliminate barriers, thus increasing positive health outcomes
  • Assist in meeting program goals that reduce harm and risk, improving the quality of life
  • Provide client-centered service that reflects status neutral healthcare and education
  • Engage and retain a focused population client in HI-V programing and their individual goals.
  • Educate on viral suppression and PrEP; providing timely linkage to care
  • Contribute to programming, marketing, and branding of culturally competent services
  • Assist in testing, inreach, outreach, representing the organization in professional settings
  • Engage volunteers and clients as directed to meet program and grant deliverables
  • Facilitate or Coordinate testing for focus populations
  • Promote Rapid treatment and Comprehensive Harm & Risk Reduction initiatives
  • Assist in Facilitating Cultural Competency trainings for organizations and individuals
  • Assist with Consumer Satisfaction Surveys and data to ensure program effectiveness
  • Assist in implementing and tracking medical and non-medical support and client outcomes
  • Work with associated staff to ensure grant deliverables and promote program continuity
  • Provide good customer service and assist in various capacities as needed

Job Type: Full-time

Pay: $22.00 – $25.00 per hour

Benefits:

  • Health insurance
  • Paid time off

Schedule:

  • 8 hour shift

COVID-19 considerations:
At this time our team is working remotely. We are developing our re-opening plan. it will adhere to any and all government and CDC guidelines.

Education:

  • Associate (Preferred)

Experience:

  • HIV/PrEP Prevention/Care/Education/Grant Implementation: 1 year (Required)
  • working with the LGBTQ community: 1 year (Required)

Language:

  • Spanish (Preferred)

Work Location:

  • One location

Work Remotely:

  • Temporarily due to COVID-19

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

April 9th is National Day of Silence

Silence is Power on this Day

 

National Day Of Silence is a yearly student-led demonstration involving members and allies of the LGBTQ+ community. This year the day falls on April 9. It is a day in which students participate by being silent throughout the day to show their support and recognition for LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) people, but can also be used as a day to recognize anyone that is silenced. Anyone can organize an activity or event, and it can be a powerful way to join together and take a stand and make your voice heard. Many communities are silenced each day, by : anti-LGBT name-calling, bullying , harassment , discriminatory state laws and among many other forms of silencing. Silence is a symbol for oppression, inaction or avoidance. “Silencing” is synonymous with shutting down or leaving behind, but not today, our silence will speak POWER.

 

History of the day

The National Day of Silence was first celebrated in April 1996. National Day of Silence was created by a student named Maria Pulzetti who wanted to make an impact on many people at schools and other places. Students organized the first event at the University of Virginia in 1996. In 1997, organizers took efforts to take the event to the national level, with almost 100 colleges and universities participating in them. In 2000, Pulzetti’s classmates and GLSEN National Student Organizer developed the proposal for the day to become an official project of GLSEN. And in 2001, the GLSEN became the official organizational sponsor with new funding, staff, and volunteers. GLSEN developed its first-ever student leadership team as part of the National Day of Silence. In the last several years, over 10,000 participants have registered their participation with GLSEN each year who are from middle schools, high schools, colleges, and universities. They include students from the U.S.A. as well as students from all around the world.

 

How can you celebrate the day

  • You can wear a unique shirt for the day in solidarity of a group or people that’s being silenced.
  • Be silent for the day.
  • Highlight communities that’s being silenced.
  • Contact your schools GSA ( Gay-Straight Alliance) to see how you can be apart of planned events ( virtually or distanced) .\
  • Sharing speaking cards that raise awareness of anti-LGBT bullying

 

National Day Of Silence

February is Black History Month

February is Black History Month
Theme
2021- The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity.
 
The DC Center is excited to explore and celebrate #BlackHistoryMonth as we support all black lives, black families, black history, and culture during this awesome time of education, unity, and support! Black History Month recognizes the many, often overlooked, contributions African Americans have made to America’s history. The evolution of Black History Month has an interesting history of its own, and dates back to the end of the Civil War. The DC Center will host various virtual events to honor the legacy of African American families in the context of their storied past and present. We will also post several stories on influential African Americans.
Who started Black History Month?
Carter G. Woodson, known as the “Father of Black History,” developed Black History Month. Woodson, whose parents were enslaved, was an author, historian and the second African American to earn a Ph.D. at Harvard University.
He recognized that the American education system offered very little information about the accomplishments of African Americans and founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, now called the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

In 1926, Woodson proposed a national “Negro History Week,” which was intended to showcase everything students learned about Black history throughout the school year.

By the time of Woodson’s death in 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life and substantial progress had been made in bringing more Americans to appreciate the celebration. At mid–century, mayors of cities nationwide issued proclamations noting Negro History Week. The Black Awakening of the 1960s dramatically expanded the consciousness of African Americans about the importance of black history, and the Civil Rights movement focused Americans of all colors on the subject of the contributions of African Americans to our history and culture.

The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” That year, fifty years after the first celebration, the association held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of Black history in the drama of the American story. Since then each American president has issued African American History Month proclamations.

But why is February designated as the month to commemorate African American history?

February is the birth month of two figures who loom large in the Black past: U.S. President Abraham Lincoln (born February 12), who issued the Emancipation Proclamation, and African American abolitionist, author, and orator Frederick Douglass (born February 14). Since the deaths of Lincoln and Douglass (in 1865 and 1895, respectively), the Black community had celebrated their contributions to African American liberation and civil rights on their birthdays.

 

Notable African American Heroes

7 Facts on George Washington Carver - BiographyGeorge Washington Carver was born enslaved and went on to become one of the most prominent scientists and inventors of his time, as well as a teacher at the Tuskegee Institute. Carver devised over 100 products using one major crop — the peanut. He experimented with the legumes to make lotions, flour, soups, dyes, plastics, and gasoline—though not peanut butter! Find out more about George Carver.

 

 

 

 

 

Shirley Chisholm | National Women's History MuseumShirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm was the first African American woman in Congress (1968) and the first woman and African American to seek the nomination for president of the United States from one of the two major political parties (1972).

Discrimination followed Chisholm’s quest for the 1972 Democratic Party presidential nomination. She was blocked from participating in televised primary debates, and after taking legal action, was permitted to make just one speech. Still, students, women, and minorities followed the “Chisholm Trail.” She entered 12 primaries and garnered 152 of the delegates’ votes (10% of the total)—despite an under-financed campaign and contentiousness from the predominantly male Congressional Black Caucus. Chisholm retired from Congress in 1983. Find out more about Shirley Chisholm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harriet Tubman - Quotes, Underground Railroad & Facts - BiographyBorn into slavery, Harriet Tubman escaped to freedom in the North in 1849 and then risked her life to lead other enslaved people to freedom.

Tubman suffered lifelong pain and illness due to her mistreatment while enslaved. Find out more about Harriet Tubman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr. - Day, Quotes & Assassination - Biography

Martin Luther King Jr. (born Michael King Jr.; January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the Civil Rights Movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968. King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, inspired by his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi. He was the son of early civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Sr..

King participated in and led marches for blacks’ right to vote, desegregation, labor rights, and other basic civil rights . Find out more about Martin Luther King Jr.

 

 

 

Transgender icon Marsha P. Johnson to be honored with monument in N.J. hometown

Marsha P Johnson is best known for her role in the 1969 Stonewall uprising and for her work supporting low-income LGBTQ people of color. Alongside fellow transgender pioneer Sylvia Rivera, Johnson co-founded the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries, a political collective that provided housing for queer youth and sex workers in lower Manhattan. Find out more about Marsha P Johnson.

 

 

 

 

James Baldwin - Quotes, Books & Poems - Biography Born in Harlem, New York, Aug. 2, 1924, James Baldwin was an essayist, novelist, playwright, poet, and social justice advocate. Baldwin is regarded as one of the foremost intellectual thinkers of the 20th century for voicing his concerns around identity, creativity and freedom. As an openly gay man during a time when homosexuality was taboo, Baldwin explored the intersections of his identities through several published works. Baldwin’s work considered what it meant to be human and explored our everyday struggles, victories, and defeats during one of the most turbulent times for blacks in America. Find out more about James Baldwin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ernestine Eckstein | Making Gay History Ernestine Eckstein (April 23, 1941 – July 15, 1992) was an African-American woman who helped steer the United States Lesbian and Gay rights movement during the 1960s. She was a leader in the New York chapter of Daughters of Bilitis (DOB). Her influence helped the DOB move away from negotiating with medical professionals and towards tactics of public demonstrations. Her understanding of, and work in, the Civil Rights Movement lent valuable experience on public protest to the lesbian and gay movement. Eckstein worked among activists such as Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin, Barbara Gittings, Franklin Kameny, and Randy Wicker. In the 1970s she became involved in the black feminist movement, in particular the organization Black Women Organized for Action (BWOA). Find out more about Ernestine Eckstein. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are just some of the many African Americans who have made a mark on us as a people and our country. We will use this month to highlight even more heroes.  

DC Hope Care Holiday Food Distribution

The Mayor’s Office of LGBTQ Affairs has partnered with ServeDC and Us Helping Us, Inc. to provide boxed groceries and prepared meals for their 2020 DC Hope Care Holiday Food Distribution! The distribution will take place on Tuesday, December 22 from 11 AM-3 PM in the small parking lot of Shiloh Baptist Church (1500 9th Street NW). They want to serve as many folks as possible. This event is FREE and boxes and meals will be provided on a first-come, first-serve basis!

Please share with anyone that might be in need.

Job Opening at the DC Center : Trauma-Informed Licensed Contract Therapist

Job Opportunities at the DC Center for the LGBT Community

Are you a trauma-informed, licensed mental health clinician interested in remote work for an established community organization in Washington DC serving the LGBTQ+ community? Are you available 10 hours per week? The DC Center for the LGBT Community is hiring!

The DC Anti-Violence Project of the DC Center for the LGBT Community is seeking a licensed clinician (LICSW/LPC/LGSW) with interest and experience in working with LGBTQ+ survivors of trauma, violence, and abuse. Exceptional interpersonal, ethical and client care skills are required. Fluency in both Spanish and English, and/or expertise in transgender and gender non-binary clinical issues are a plus. Familiarity with MyClients+ or other EHR systems also a plus. Experience in providing telecounseling via Zoom HIPAA-compliant video platform is desired.

Contract Therapist Position:

The DC Center for the LGBT Community has a mission of educating, empowering, celebrating, and connecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community of Washington, DC. Licensed therapists (LICSW, LGSW, LPC) help to achieve this mission by providing trauma-informed mental health support services to survivors of violence, crime, and trauma. These services are available free-of-charge to our community members due to grant funding from the Office of Victim Services and Justice Grants (OVSJG). The trauma-informed licensed Contract Therapist is a part-time (10 hours per week, $40/hour) position in the DC Center’s Anti-Violence Project, with funding at minimum through March 31, 2021 and potential continued funding through 2022. Currently, the work is remote. If the pandemic conditions shift toward reliable public safety, work may resume in-person at The DC Center’s location in Northwest Washington, DC. Limited street parking is accessible. The U St Metro is one block from the center. Agency does not pay for parking. There is limited funding available for weekly clinical supervision if desired. The position may be extended upon receipt of additional funding and could expand to a full-time opportunity. The person who fills this position is also responsible for keeping notes in the MyClients+ EHR system. The Contract Therapist will report to the full-time licensed Therapist/Advocate. Schedule is flexible. Stable internet and a remote working environment which protects confidentiality is essential.

Special Skills:

The Therapist/Advocate must have the appropriate licensure to practice in DC (LGSW, LICSW, LPC) and have at least 2 years’ experience working as a clinician with a diverse client population. They must also have a demonstrated ability to work with LGBTQ+ adults, to work well in a team, to problem solve and communicate at all levels verbally as well as in writing. Must be self-motivated, ethical, and ideally be knowledgeable with key stakeholders in the larger victim-serving network of Washington, DC. Bilingual capabilities in Spanish and English is desired. Expertise in transgender and gender non-binary clinical issues is a plus.

Functions and Duties:

  • Provide individual and group mental health support services, via telecounseling or in-person if public safety permits the DC Center to return to in-person operations, to a minimum caseload of 5-8 unique clients, 45-minute individual sessions and/or 1.5-hour group sessions.
  • Conduct intake assessments with all new potential clients to assess safety, job status, financial resources, living arrangements, current support system, type and history of victimization, legal issues, related medical history, and clinical symptomatology.
  • Provide clients with LGBTQ-friendly and affirming referrals to community-based services, aimed at assisting individuals affected by crime, violence, and trauma.
  • Assess clients and provide necessary intervention in crisis situations (safety plans, hospitalization, referrals, etc.)
  • Keep current and accurate records of all clinical interactions in an electronic clinical database system (MyClients+).
  • Meet weekly with Therapist/Advocate for case review and/or support.
  • Work well with a diverse staff to facilitate an open, supportive and warm environment for all individuals who connect with The DC Center and represent the DC Center professionally within the community.

Please send resume and cover letter to kimberley@thedccenter.org.