Case Management & Advocacy Specialist Position Available

Job Opportunity at the DC Center for the LGBT Community

The DC Anti-Violence Project of the DC Center for the LGBT Community is seeking a community-based trauma-informed mental health professional to provide case management services to and advocacy for LGBTQ+ survivors of trauma, violence, and abuse in the DMV area. The position also involves community leadership in facilitating community meetings/activities and in networking with and educating survivor services providers, to strengthen the appropriate and effective response of LGBTQ+ competent service provision to LGBTQ+ trauma survivors. Exceptional interpersonal, ethical, intercultural and client care skills are required. Fluency in both Spanish and English, expertise in transgender and gender non-binary and BIPOC issues and/or clinical licensure are a plus. Familiarity with TheraNest or other EHR systems is also a plus. Experience in providing telehealth via Zoom HIPAA-compliant video platform is desired, as the position includes virtual and in-person service provision.

CMA Specialist Position summary:

Since 2002, The DC Center for the LGBT Community has implemented a mission of educating, empowering, celebrating, uplifting and connecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community of Washington, DC. The Case Management and Advocacy (CMA) Specialist position helps to achieve this mission by providing case management and advocacy support services to LGBTQ+ survivors of violence, crime, and trauma. These services are available free-of-charge to our community members due to grant funding from the Office of Victim Services and Justice Grants (OVSJG). The CMA Specialist will work with community members and clients individually via email, phone, HIPAA-compliant Zoom and in person, and as a member of the Behavioral Health Services (BHS) team, supporting two licensed mental health clinicians in connecting BHS clients to needed services. The CMA Specialist will also facilitate the monthly meetings of the DC Anti-Violence Project (DCAVP) and related community based violence intervention, education and advocacy activities. The person who fills this position is also responsible for assisting on other related projects, such as record-keeping for the quarterly/ annual reporting and management of the OVSJG grant, outreach and education in the LGBTQ+ community, and assisting the mission, vision, and values of The DC Anti-Violence Project (DCAVP). There is limited funding available for professional development, and to assist with costs of renewing DC & MD licenses, if applicable. The CMA Specialist will assist with administrative needs as determined by the BHS/DCAVP Project Manager and report to the Executive Director. 

Special Skills:

The CMA Specialist must have at least 2 years’ experience working as a trauma-informed case manager and advocate with a diverse client population. They must have a demonstrated ability to work with LGBTQ+ adults, to work well as a team member, to problem solve and communicate at all levels verbally as well as in writing. Exceptional interpersonal, ethical, intercultural and client care skills are required. Must be self-motivated, ethical, and be able to build and maintain relationships with clients, colleagues and with key stakeholders in the larger victim-serving network of Washington, DC. The ideal candidate will have prior nonprofit experience and crisis assessment, intervention and referral experience. Fluency in both Spanish and English, expertise in transgender and gender non-binary and BIPOC issues and/or clinical licensure are a plus.

CMA Specialist Functions and Duties

  • Be the point of contact and initial assessment for requests for mental health assistance and triage the requests as appropriate for referral to BHS clinicians and case management and advocacy to relevant providers within the District networks of care
  • Provide trauma-informed and interculturally competent case management assistance to DCAVP BHS clients (LGBTQ+ survivors of trauma, violence and abuse) in accessing appropriate organizations and providers for services beyond the parameters of mental health counseling offered by the DCAVP BHS Therapists
  • Provide email/phone/drop-in and virtual response to and follow-up with LGBTQ+ clients’ requests for advocacy, info & referral and warm-handoffs to wrap-around services in the District
  • Provide LGBTQ+ clients in crisis necessary crisis intervention, consultation and referrals to appropriate support systems (safety plans, hospitalization, referrals, etc.) as well as connection into BHS individual and group counseling services as appropriate
  • Build and maintain the BHS Providers List of LGBQ, TGNC, BIPOC competent, trauma-informed, culturally diverse mental health clinicians who are affordable and accessible for low-to-no income LGBTQ+ clients seeking long-term counseling services
  • Facilitate the monthly meetings of the DCAVP and manage the DCAVP listservs and social media outreach and advocacy activities, working in partnership with DCAVP community members to further the mission, vision, and values of the DCAVP
  • Write and coordinate DCAVP response for Community Impact Statements to support hate bias cases, in partnership with the the MPD LGBTSU and USAO, and public relations response as needed
  • Coordinate and/or represent the DCAVP at LGBTQ+ expert community collaborations and consultations with the partnering organizations in the continuum of services in the District (including VAN, VPART, HBTF)
  • Be the point of contact for requests for DCAVP collaboration and expertise on community programs and policy committees (such as the VAN, VPART, DCAVP, HBTF and others) and for requests for LGBTQ+ competency education and training for community organization professionals in LGBTQ+ issues and best practices for service provision
  • Build the District’s statistical knowledge base about crimes against and effective services for LGBTQ+ residents by designing client services and events evaluation processes and performing research and analysis of statistics culled from clients and feedback to assist in program development, funding requests and requests for informational statistics
  • Assist with keeping clinical statistical data, implementing and analyzing client evaluation feedback and writing quarterly reports and other grant deliverables for the OVSJG grant throughout the fiscal year, as determined by the BHS/DCAVP Project Manager
  • Assist in the management of the Direct Client Assistance program, a fund of resources to assist LGBTQ+ survivors in securing technology, internet connectivity, training and transportation to be able to consistently and safely access support services
  • Collaborate with DC Center staff to provide community-based education and outreach opportunities in line with OVSJG DCAVP grant requirements 
  • Keep a current schedule and accurate records of all clinical and non-clinical interactions in the systems in use by the DC Center and BHS team
  • Work well with a diverse staff team to facilitate an open, supportive and warm environment for all individuals who connect with The DC Center and represent the DC Center professionally within the community.

Salary range is $48,000-50,000.

Position includes health insurance, vacation and personal leave benefits.

Position is grant-funded on an annual basis (Oct 1, 2022 through Sept 30, 2023).

To apply, please send resumes and cover letters to supportdesk@thedccenter.org.

Search remains open at this time.

Binder Donation Project

The DC Center is excited to continue their partnership with GC2B Transitional Apparel! GC2B has reached out to many organizations in the DC area and provided free binders for them to give away, and the DC Center is fortunate enough to be one of them.

Everyone and anyone is welcome to come by the DC Center at any point during regular office hours (12-6 pm Monday through Friday and 11-3PM on Saturday) and get fitted for a free binder!

Sizes range from XS to 5X.

We have received 50+ binders from GC2B! As we learn what sizes and styles are most in need in our community, we will be adjusting what we request in our recurring shipments from GC2B. This means that at the beginning of the program we have limited numbers. If your size is unfortunately not available, we will add you to a waitlist and get you what you need as soon as possible!

This is a no-gatekeeping event. Whoever you are, whatever you look like, whatever you need your binder for, come by the DC Center and pick up what you need for FREE!

Questions? Call the DC Center at 202-682-2245 or email supportdesk@thedccenter.org

Breastfeeding Center for Greater Washington presents – LGBTQ+ Postnatal Group

Breastfeeding Center for Greater Washington presents –
LGBTQ+ Postnatal Group:

“This group is specifically designed for the LGBTQ+ community who have welcomed a new baby into their family in the past year. Our goal is to create a space that fosters a supportive community for new parents. We welcome birthing, adoptive or gestational carrier LGBTQ+ families who are within the first year of their baby’s life. You can attend this group as a the birthing person, partner, alone or together.
This free, biweekly group is led by Mel Kennedy. Mel is an experienced doula in the DMV, a student midwife, and a member of the LGBTQ+ community. Registration includes yourself + a support person (free). Offered on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month at 10:30am-12pm.”

Breastfeeding Center for Greater Washington presents: LGBTQ+ Prenatal Group

Breastfeeding Center for Greater Washington presents
LGBTQ+ Prenatal Group:

“This group is specifically designed for the LGBTQ+ community preparing to welcome a baby into their family. Our goal is to create a space that fosters a supportive community for soon-to-be parents. We welcome birthing, adoptive or gestational carrier LGBTQ+ families who are at any stage of pregnancy. You can attend this group as a pregnant person, partner, alone or together.
This free, biweekly group is led by Mel Kennedy. Mel is an experienced doula in the DMV, a student midwife, and a member of the LGBTQ+ community. Registration for this group includes includes yourself + a support person (free). Offered on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of every month at 7-8:30pm”

Free at Home HIV and STI Test Kits for DC,MD and VA residents

From the convenience of your home you can privately get tested, you can now order a free at home HIV and STI test kit, these tests require no proof of income or insurance. DCs program is administered by the DC Health Department. MD and VA’s programs are run by the Virginia Department of Health, Division of Disease Prevention, with support from the Maryland Department of Health, Center for HIV Prevention and Health Services. Test kits are mailed discretely in a USPS box.

 

Maryland and Virginia residents click here

DC residents click here

 

Desde la comodidad de su hogar, puede hacerse la prueba de forma privada, ahora puede solicitar un kit de prueba de VIH e ITS gratis en el hogar, estas pruebas no requieren prueba de ingresos o seguro. El programa de DC es administrado por el Departamento de Salud de DC. Los programas de MD y VA están a cargo de la División de Prevención de Enfermedades del Departamento de Salud de Virginia, con el apoyo del Centro de Servicios de Salud y Prevención del VIH del Departamento de Salud de Maryland. Los kits de prueba se envían por correo discretamente en una caja de USPS.

Residentes de Maryland y Virginia, haga clic aquí

Residentes de DC haga clic aquí

Undetected: More Than A Status

In honor of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and Black History month,  join us  for our special programing highlighting the strengths and weaknesses in the black community and how we move forward – together – stronger . will be a having a candid talk about how HIV and Stigma affects the black community , paneled by local and national activist from around the United States. One of our panelist is Shawnte Spriggs, Shawnte Spriggs is a phenomenal speaker, writer and advocate who continues to do phenomenal work in the Black community for individuals living with HIV. From facilitating support groups and attending grant meetings to the birth of her prolific book, Undetected: More Than A Status, Shawnte has continued to battle HIV stigma towards advancement of the Black community. Below is a quick synapsis of her book. For individuals who join our programming, we will be offering free copies of her inspirational book.

Summary: 
Undetected is a quick and easy read to help better understand the emotional challenges and outcomes a person living with HIV can undergo during their journey to overall wellness. This book is designed for individuals diagnosed with HIV, their Friends and Family and anyone servicing people living with HIV. This book will: (1) Show you common emotions and mindsets associated with this diagnosis; (2) Review the effects of past and unresolved Trauma; (3)Share various ways support can possibly look for a person living with HIV; (4) Provide practical and healthy tips to render positive and productive results.

Purchase a Copy

Amazon link

 

FDA Approves 1st Long-acting HIV Drug Combo, Monthly Shots

HIV Working Group

U.S. regulators have approved the first long-acting drug combo for HIV, monthly shots that can replace the daily pills now used to control infection with the AIDS virus.

Thursday’s approval of the two-shot combo called Cabenuva is expected to make it easier for people to stay on track with their HIV medicines and to do so with more privacy. It’s a huge change from not long ago, when patients had to take multiple pills several times a day, carefully timed around meals.

“That will enhance quality of life” to need treatment just once a month, said Dr. Steven Deeks, an HIV specialist at the University of California, San Francisco, who has no ties to the drug’s makers. “People don’t want those daily reminders that they’re HIV infected.”

Cabenuva combines rilpivirine, sold as Edurant by Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen unit, and a new drug — cabotegravir, from ViiV Healthcare. They’re packaged together and given as separate shots once a month. Dosing every two months also is being tested.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Cabenuva for use in adults who have had their disease well controlled by conventional HIV medicines and who have not shown signs of viral resistance to the two drugs in Cabenuva.

The agency also approved a pill version of cabotegravir to be taken with rilpivarine for a month before switching to the shots to be sure the drugs are well tolerated.

ViiV said the shot combo would cost $5,940 for an initial, higher dose and $3,960 per month afterward. The company said that is “within the range” of what one-a-day pill combos cost now. How much a patient pays depends on insurance, income and other things.

Studies found that patients greatly preferred the shots.

“Even people who are taking one pill once a day just reported improvement in their quality of life to switch to an injection,” said Dr. Judith Currier, an HIV specialist at the University of California, Los Angeles. She consults for ViiV and wrote a commentary accompanying one study of the drug in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Deeks said long-acting shots also give hope of reaching groups that have a hard time sticking to treatment, including people with mental illness or substance abuse problems.

“There’s a great unmet need” that the shots may fill, he said.

Separately, ViiV plans to seek approval for cabotegravir for HIV prevention. Two recent studies found that cabotegravir shots every two months were better than daily Truvada pills for keeping uninfected people from catching the virus from an infected sex partner.

 

 

 

Sourced from The National Broadcasting Company

Queer Women Working Through Trauma Therapy Group Oct 13-Dec 15, 2020

Queer Women Working Through Trauma

The Queer Women Working Through Trauma group invites individuals to focus on processing trauma as a group through a variety of therapeutic techniques, learning to manage triggers and painful memories, and other behavioral processing activities. Participants will also focus on the mind-body connection throughout the course of the group, engaging in art and expression activities, mindful meditation/visualization, deep breathing, and other tactile exercises to help process through trauma responses while creating accessible coping strategies.

The group is held weekly for 10 weeks on Tuesday evenings from 5:45 pm – 7 pm. The next cycle of the group will start on October 13 and will meet remotely via Zoom. If you are interested in being a part of an upcoming cycle of the group or getting on the waiting list for the next one, please contact our staff therapist, Christina Cappelletti, LGSW, to set up a time for a telecounseling intake session: christinac@thedccenter.org. 

This group is offered at no cost to clients, thanks to a grant from the Office of Victim Services and Justice Grants.

We Are Closed In Observance Of Juneteenth

 

The DC Center will be closed on June 19, 2020 in observance of Juneteenth

and

to support the #StrikeForBlackLives. #BlackLivesMatter

If you are facing a life threatening situation or seeking immediate care:

DC Mobile Crisis: 202-673-9300
DC Shelter Hotline: 202.399.7093 or 311
Maryland Mobile Crisis: 240-777-4000
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255
Trans Lifeline: 877-565-8860
LGBTQ under 25: Trevor Lifeline: 866-488-7386
LGBTQ National Help Center (all ages – various lines/hours): 888-843-4564 www.glbthotline.org

 

Covid-19 and HIV

Although the risk of serious illness from COVID-19 for people with HIV is not known, people with HIV may have concerns and questions related to their risk.

This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation and CDC will provide updated information as it becomes available.

 

Are people with HIV at higher risk for Covid-19 than other people ?

At the present time, we have no specific information about the risk of COVID-19 in people with HIV.

Older adults and people of any age who have a serious underlying medical condition might be at higher risk for severe illness, including people who are immunocompromised. The risk for people with HIV getting very sick is greatest in:

  • People with a low CD4 cell count, and
  • People not on HIV treatment (antiretroviral therapy or ART).

People with HIV can also be at increased risk of getting very sick with COVID-19 based on their age and other medical conditions.

 

What can people with HIV do to protect themselves from COVID-19.

There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent getting sick is to avoid exposure to the virus.

People with HIV should take everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

People with HIV should also continue to maintain a healthy lifestyle. This includes:

Staying healthy helps your immune system fight off infection should it occur.

If you have HIV and are taking your HIV medicine, it is important to continue your treatment and follow the advice of your health care provider. This is the best way to keep your immune system healthy.

What should I do if I think I might have Covid-19?

Call your health care provider if you develop symptoms that could be consistent with COVID-19. Discuss how to get evaluated and how to avoid potentially exposing others to COVID-19.

Learn more about COVID-19 and what to do if you get sick.

 

What else can people with HIV who are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 do to protect themselves?

Nearly half of people in the United States with diagnosed HIV are aged 50 years and older. People with HIV also have higher rates of certain underlying health conditions. Both increased age and these conditions can increase their risk for more severe illness if people with HIV get COVID-19, especially people with advanced HIV.

Steps that people with HIV can take to prepare in addition to what is recommended for everybody:

  • Make sure you have at least a 30-day supply of your HIV medicine and any other medications or medical supplies you need for managing HIV.
  • Talk to your health care provider and make sure all your vaccinations are up-to-date, including vaccinations against seasonal influenza and bacterial pneumonia because these vaccine preventable diseases disproportionally affect people with HIV.
  • Establish a plan for clinical care if you have to stay at home for a couple of weeks. Try to establish a telemedicine link through your HIV care provider’s online portal. If telemedicine is not available to you, make sure you can communicate with your provider by phone or text.
  • Make sure you can maintain a social network remotely, such as online, by phone, or by video chat. This can help you stay socially connected and mentally healthy, which is especially important for people with HIV.
  • People with HIV can sometimes be more likely than others to need extra help, from friends, family, neighbors, community health workers, and others. If you become sick make sure you stay in touch by phone or email with people who can help you.

 

Can HIV medicine (ART) be used to treat Covid-19?

Some types of HIV medicine (for example, lopinavir-ritonavir) to treat COVID-19 are being evaluated. Results from a clinical trialexternal icon in China showed that lopinavir-ritonavir did not speed up recovery or reduce the amount of virus produced in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and pneumonia. More than 15 clinical trials of HIV medicines are registered on ClinicalTrials.govexternal icon. Until more is known about the effects of these medicines on COVID-19, people with HIV should not switch their HIV medicine in an attempt to prevent or treat COVID-19.

 

Are shortages of HIV medicine (ART)  or pre-exposure prophylaxis (PreP) expected?

Drug shortages or anticipated problems with HIV medicine have not been identified.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is closely monitoring the drug supply chain as the COVID-19 outbreak has the potential to disrupt the supply of medical and pharmaceutical products in the United States.

The National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) has also remained in contact with the major manufacturers of HIV medicine as many of these products rely on ingredients produced in China.

As of March 10, 2020, there were no reports of manufacturing concerns or supply shortages.

Learn more about the FDA’s response to COVID-19external icon.

 

Should people with HIV travel at this time?

For the latest CDC travel recommendations, visit CDC’s COVID-19 travel information page.

 

What can everyone do to minimize the stigma about Covid-19?

Minimizing stigma and misinformation about COVID-19 is very important. People with HIV have experience in dealing with stigma and can be allies in preventing COVID-19 stigma. Learn how you can reduce stigma and help prevent the spread of rumors about COVID-19.

 

 

 

Information sourced from the Center for Disease Control.