Job Opening – Lutheran Church of the Reformation Washington, DC

Job Interview Skills

Open Positions

Lutheran Church of the Reformation

Washington, DC

Applications due: September 15, 2021

Preferred Start Date: Immediate and negotiable

Director of Operations (reposting)

Lutheran Church of the Reformation seeks a creative leader and effective manager to serve as director of operations to help us worship God, serve our neighbors, and care for creation. The director of operations manages the facilities, office, and financial ministries. The director of operations supervises and collaborates with a great variety of people, communicates effectively with compassion, and manages projects with technical savvy.  This is a full-time position (Monday-Friday) performed in the congregation office. The starting salary range is $55,000-60,000. Also included are health benefits, 6% retirement contributions, and three weeks of vacation in addition to a Christmas and New Years holiday week.

Administrative Assistant 

Lutheran Church of the Reformation seeks a part-time administrative assistant to advance God’s mission and ministry. The administrative assistant prepares and publishes the weekly worship booklet, provides front office and clerical support, and assists with the Food Pantry distribution. This position facilitates a healthy, effective flow of information within the congregation and with its partners. This is a 32-hour/week position (Monday-Thursday) performed in the congregation office. The hourly starting wage is $20. Also included are health benefits, 6% retirement contributions, and three weeks of vacation in addition to a Christmas and New Years holiday week.

Visit the website www.ReformationDC.org/apply to learn about the congregation and see complete job descriptions, including compensation and benefits. Generous and competitive compensation package includes health, dental, and retirement benefits. To apply, send a cover letter and resume to the Rev. Michael D. Wilker at apply@ReformationDC.org.

Lutheran Church of the Reformation is a dynamic spiritual community located in Washington, DC’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. Reformation enjoys an active, diverse, and engaged congregation of 170 households. The Holy Spirit inspires and provokes us to keep reforming church and society. Since 1987, Reformation has welcomed and affirmed LGBTQ+ persons and their families. We work for racial equity and economic justice within our community and nation. The congregation has a large facility comprised of the sanctuary building, education building, and three row houses. We maintain several long-term space use agreements with approximately ten equally diverse, independent organizations that serve children and adults, including Hill Havurah, the Jewish community on Capitol Hill. Reformation also hosts many groups for other religious, cultural, and advocacy events.

Capital Pride Celebration Washington DC

IT’S TIME TO CELEBRATE. 

#StillWe continues be a powerful statement about the resilience, struggles, celebrations, and pride that exist within our community. In a year like no other, still, we came together to educate, advocate for change, uplift marginalized voices, and support our neighbors.  

As it becomes safer for us to come together once again, we hope that you will join the Capital Pride Alliance in 2021, as we celebrate our community and continue the important work that we’ve committed ourselves to. Whether you plan on celebrating virtually or in person, our upcoming events provide safe and creative ways to honor our local traditions while taking into account varying levels of personal comfortThere are many ways to celebrate Pride in Washington, DC!

 

CLICK HERE TO VISIT THE OFFICIAL DC PRIDE WEBSITE

Hotline to Improve Access to COVID-19 Vaccines for Older Adults and People with Disabilities

Help with COVID-19 vaccinations for older adults and people with disabilities

Call 888-677-1199 Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Eastern)  – or –  email DIAL@n4a.org  

The Disability Information and Access Line (DIAL) is now available to help people with disabilities get vaccinated.  The DIAL’s trained staff is standing by to:

  • Help find local vaccination locations
  • Assist with making vaccination appointments
  • Connect callers to local services – such as accessible transportation – to overcome barriers to vaccination.

The hotline also can provide information and resources to answer questions and address concerns about the vaccines and can connect callers to information and services that promote independent living and address fundamental needs, such as food, housing, and transportation.

DIAL is operated as a collaboration between a consortium of organizations serving people with disabilities and the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a). The consortium includes:

  • Association of Programs for Rural Independent Living (APRIL),
  • Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD),
  • Independent Living Research Utilization (ILRU),
  • National Association of Councils on Developmental Disabilities (NACDD),
  • National Council on Independent Living (NCIL),
  • National Disabilities Rights Network (NDRN), and
  • The Partnership for Inclusive Disaster Strategies.

This collaboration benefits from the disability networks’ extensive knowledge and expertise in meeting the needs of people with disabilities across the U.S. and n4a’s decades of experience operating the Eldercare Locator, the only federally funded national information and referral resource that supports consumers across the spectrum of issues affecting older Americans.

Job Opening at the DC Center : Community Engagement Specialist

Job Type

Full-time
Number of hires for this role – 1

Qualifications

    • Associate (Preferred)

    • Spanish (Preferred)

Full Job Description

The qualified individual will be responsible for the following:

  • Collect and enter data from focus populations in respective systems (Careware, Link U)
  • Engage groups and individual in sexual health education and planning sessions
  • Provide referrals to eliminate barriers, thus increasing positive health outcomes
  • Assist in meeting program goals that reduce harm and risk, improving the quality of life
  • Provide client-centered service that reflects status neutral healthcare and education
  • Engage and retain a focused population client in HI-V programing and their individual goals.
  • Educate on viral suppression and PrEP; providing timely linkage to care
  • Contribute to programming, marketing, and branding of culturally competent services
  • Assist in testing, inreach, outreach, representing the organization in professional settings
  • Engage volunteers and clients as directed to meet program and grant deliverables
  • Facilitate or Coordinate testing for focus populations
  • Promote Rapid treatment and Comprehensive Harm & Risk Reduction initiatives
  • Assist in Facilitating Cultural Competency trainings for organizations and individuals
  • Assist with Consumer Satisfaction Surveys and data to ensure program effectiveness
  • Assist in implementing and tracking medical and non-medical support and client outcomes
  • Work with associated staff to ensure grant deliverables and promote program continuity
  • Provide good customer service and assist in various capacities as needed

Job Type: Full-time

Pay: $22.00 – $25.00 per hour

Benefits:

  • Health insurance
  • Paid time off

Schedule:

  • 8 hour shift

COVID-19 considerations:
At this time our team is working remotely. We are developing our re-opening plan. it will adhere to any and all government and CDC guidelines.

Education:

  • Associate (Preferred)

Experience:

  • HIV/PrEP Prevention/Care/Education/Grant Implementation: 1 year (Required)
  • working with the LGBTQ community: 1 year (Required)

Language:

  • Spanish (Preferred)

Work Location:

  • One location

Work Remotely:

  • Temporarily due to COVID-19

CLICK HERE TO APPLY

April 9th is National Day of Silence

Silence is Power on this Day

 

National Day Of Silence is a yearly student-led demonstration involving members and allies of the LGBTQ+ community. This year the day falls on April 9. It is a day in which students participate by being silent throughout the day to show their support and recognition for LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) people, but can also be used as a day to recognize anyone that is silenced. Anyone can organize an activity or event, and it can be a powerful way to join together and take a stand and make your voice heard. Many communities are silenced each day, by : anti-LGBT name-calling, bullying , harassment , discriminatory state laws and among many other forms of silencing. Silence is a symbol for oppression, inaction or avoidance. “Silencing” is synonymous with shutting down or leaving behind, but not today, our silence will speak POWER.

 

History of the day

The National Day of Silence was first celebrated in April 1996. National Day of Silence was created by a student named Maria Pulzetti who wanted to make an impact on many people at schools and other places. Students organized the first event at the University of Virginia in 1996. In 1997, organizers took efforts to take the event to the national level, with almost 100 colleges and universities participating in them. In 2000, Pulzetti’s classmates and GLSEN National Student Organizer developed the proposal for the day to become an official project of GLSEN. And in 2001, the GLSEN became the official organizational sponsor with new funding, staff, and volunteers. GLSEN developed its first-ever student leadership team as part of the National Day of Silence. In the last several years, over 10,000 participants have registered their participation with GLSEN each year who are from middle schools, high schools, colleges, and universities. They include students from the U.S.A. as well as students from all around the world.

 

How can you celebrate the day

  • You can wear a unique shirt for the day in solidarity of a group or people that’s being silenced.
  • Be silent for the day.
  • Highlight communities that’s being silenced.
  • Contact your schools GSA ( Gay-Straight Alliance) to see how you can be apart of planned events ( virtually or distanced) .\
  • Sharing speaking cards that raise awareness of anti-LGBT bullying

 

National Day Of Silence

SMYAL LGBTQ Youth Leadership Awards

SMYAL has launched the applications for their annual Youth Leadership Award for LGBTQ+ youth getting ready to start their first year of higher education.

The SMYAL LGBTQ Youth Leadership Awards provides financial support (up to $5,000) to offset the costs of continuing one’s education, whether at a technical or trade school, or a two or four year college or university. Funds may be used for everything from tuition to housing, room and board, or materials required for the program. The award is open to youth who will have graduated high school or completed a GED by Spring 2021, and will start their next educational program by the Spring of 2022. To apply, visit www.SMYAL.org/Scholarship. See the attached flier for more details, or reach out to Ty Kitchen (ty.kitchen@smyal.org) for more information.

Happy Presidents’ Day

Holiday Closing. Information about our holiday schedule below.

Happy Presidents Day from the team at the DC Center.

On this day we look forward to seeing all the promises that the Biden Administration has made, come to fruition. We believe Mr Biden is an ally to our community, in 2012, in the midst of what many expected to be a tough reelection campaign for the Obama White House, Biden surprised the political world during an appearance on “Meet the Press” by becoming the first national leader to publicly support same-sex marriage as president the Joe Biden administration issued an executive order that is aimed at preventing discrimination on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation and prohibiting workplace discrimination in the federal government, he also signed an order reversing a Trump-era Pentagon policy that largely barred transgender individuals from serving in the military. President Joe Biden has tapped Pennsylvania Health Secretary Rachel Levine to be his assistant secretary of health, leaving her poised to become the first openly transgender federal official to be confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

Undetected: More Than A Status

In honor of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and Black History month,  join us  for our special programing highlighting the strengths and weaknesses in the black community and how we move forward – together – stronger . will be a having a candid talk about how HIV and Stigma affects the black community , paneled by local and national activist from around the United States. One of our panelist is Shawnte Spriggs, Shawnte Spriggs is a phenomenal speaker, writer and advocate who continues to do phenomenal work in the Black community for individuals living with HIV. From facilitating support groups and attending grant meetings to the birth of her prolific book, Undetected: More Than A Status, Shawnte has continued to battle HIV stigma towards advancement of the Black community. Below is a quick synapsis of her book. For individuals who join our programming, we will be offering free copies of her inspirational book.

Summary: 
Undetected is a quick and easy read to help better understand the emotional challenges and outcomes a person living with HIV can undergo during their journey to overall wellness. This book is designed for individuals diagnosed with HIV, their Friends and Family and anyone servicing people living with HIV. This book will: (1) Show you common emotions and mindsets associated with this diagnosis; (2) Review the effects of past and unresolved Trauma; (3)Share various ways support can possibly look for a person living with HIV; (4) Provide practical and healthy tips to render positive and productive results.

Purchase a Copy

Amazon link

 

February is Black History Month

February is Black History Month
Theme
2021- The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity.
 
The DC Center is excited to explore and celebrate #BlackHistoryMonth as we support all black lives, black families, black history, and culture during this awesome time of education, unity, and support! Black History Month recognizes the many, often overlooked, contributions African Americans have made to America’s history. The evolution of Black History Month has an interesting history of its own, and dates back to the end of the Civil War. The DC Center will host various virtual events to honor the legacy of African American families in the context of their storied past and present. We will also post several stories on influential African Americans.
Who started Black History Month?
Carter G. Woodson, known as the “Father of Black History,” developed Black History Month. Woodson, whose parents were enslaved, was an author, historian and the second African American to earn a Ph.D. at Harvard University.
He recognized that the American education system offered very little information about the accomplishments of African Americans and founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, now called the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

In 1926, Woodson proposed a national “Negro History Week,” which was intended to showcase everything students learned about Black history throughout the school year.

By the time of Woodson’s death in 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life and substantial progress had been made in bringing more Americans to appreciate the celebration. At mid–century, mayors of cities nationwide issued proclamations noting Negro History Week. The Black Awakening of the 1960s dramatically expanded the consciousness of African Americans about the importance of black history, and the Civil Rights movement focused Americans of all colors on the subject of the contributions of African Americans to our history and culture.

The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” That year, fifty years after the first celebration, the association held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of Black history in the drama of the American story. Since then each American president has issued African American History Month proclamations.

But why is February designated as the month to commemorate African American history?

February is the birth month of two figures who loom large in the Black past: U.S. President Abraham Lincoln (born February 12), who issued the Emancipation Proclamation, and African American abolitionist, author, and orator Frederick Douglass (born February 14). Since the deaths of Lincoln and Douglass (in 1865 and 1895, respectively), the Black community had celebrated their contributions to African American liberation and civil rights on their birthdays.

 

Notable African American Heroes

7 Facts on George Washington Carver - BiographyGeorge Washington Carver was born enslaved and went on to become one of the most prominent scientists and inventors of his time, as well as a teacher at the Tuskegee Institute. Carver devised over 100 products using one major crop — the peanut. He experimented with the legumes to make lotions, flour, soups, dyes, plastics, and gasoline—though not peanut butter! Find out more about George Carver.

 

 

 

 

 

Shirley Chisholm | National Women's History MuseumShirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm was the first African American woman in Congress (1968) and the first woman and African American to seek the nomination for president of the United States from one of the two major political parties (1972).

Discrimination followed Chisholm’s quest for the 1972 Democratic Party presidential nomination. She was blocked from participating in televised primary debates, and after taking legal action, was permitted to make just one speech. Still, students, women, and minorities followed the “Chisholm Trail.” She entered 12 primaries and garnered 152 of the delegates’ votes (10% of the total)—despite an under-financed campaign and contentiousness from the predominantly male Congressional Black Caucus. Chisholm retired from Congress in 1983. Find out more about Shirley Chisholm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harriet Tubman - Quotes, Underground Railroad & Facts - BiographyBorn into slavery, Harriet Tubman escaped to freedom in the North in 1849 and then risked her life to lead other enslaved people to freedom.

Tubman suffered lifelong pain and illness due to her mistreatment while enslaved. Find out more about Harriet Tubman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr. - Day, Quotes & Assassination - Biography

Martin Luther King Jr. (born Michael King Jr.; January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the Civil Rights Movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968. King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, inspired by his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi. He was the son of early civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Sr..

King participated in and led marches for blacks’ right to vote, desegregation, labor rights, and other basic civil rights . Find out more about Martin Luther King Jr.

 

 

 

Transgender icon Marsha P. Johnson to be honored with monument in N.J. hometown

Marsha P Johnson is best known for her role in the 1969 Stonewall uprising and for her work supporting low-income LGBTQ people of color. Alongside fellow transgender pioneer Sylvia Rivera, Johnson co-founded the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries, a political collective that provided housing for queer youth and sex workers in lower Manhattan. Find out more about Marsha P Johnson.

 

 

 

 

James Baldwin - Quotes, Books & Poems - Biography Born in Harlem, New York, Aug. 2, 1924, James Baldwin was an essayist, novelist, playwright, poet, and social justice advocate. Baldwin is regarded as one of the foremost intellectual thinkers of the 20th century for voicing his concerns around identity, creativity and freedom. As an openly gay man during a time when homosexuality was taboo, Baldwin explored the intersections of his identities through several published works. Baldwin’s work considered what it meant to be human and explored our everyday struggles, victories, and defeats during one of the most turbulent times for blacks in America. Find out more about James Baldwin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ernestine Eckstein | Making Gay History Ernestine Eckstein (April 23, 1941 – July 15, 1992) was an African-American woman who helped steer the United States Lesbian and Gay rights movement during the 1960s. She was a leader in the New York chapter of Daughters of Bilitis (DOB). Her influence helped the DOB move away from negotiating with medical professionals and towards tactics of public demonstrations. Her understanding of, and work in, the Civil Rights Movement lent valuable experience on public protest to the lesbian and gay movement. Eckstein worked among activists such as Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin, Barbara Gittings, Franklin Kameny, and Randy Wicker. In the 1970s she became involved in the black feminist movement, in particular the organization Black Women Organized for Action (BWOA). Find out more about Ernestine Eckstein. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are just some of the many African Americans who have made a mark on us as a people and our country. We will use this month to highlight even more heroes.