Job Opening at the DC Center : Trauma-Informed Licensed Contract Therapist

Job Opportunities at the DC Center for the LGBT Community

Are you a trauma-informed, licensed mental health clinician interested in remote work for an established community organization in Washington DC serving the LGBTQ+ community? Are you available 10 hours per week? The DC Center for the LGBT Community is hiring!

The DC Anti-Violence Project of the DC Center for the LGBT Community is seeking a licensed clinician (LICSW/LPC/LGSW) with interest and experience in working with LGBTQ+ survivors of trauma, violence, and abuse. Exceptional interpersonal, ethical and client care skills are required. Fluency in both Spanish and English, and/or expertise in transgender and gender non-binary clinical issues are a plus. Familiarity with MyClients+ or other EHR systems also a plus. Experience in providing telecounseling via Zoom HIPAA-compliant video platform is desired.

Contract Therapist Position:

The DC Center for the LGBT Community has a mission of educating, empowering, celebrating, and connecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community of Washington, DC. Licensed therapists (LICSW, LGSW, LPC) help to achieve this mission by providing trauma-informed mental health support services to survivors of violence, crime, and trauma. These services are available free-of-charge to our community members due to grant funding from the Office of Victim Services and Justice Grants (OVSJG). The trauma-informed licensed Contract Therapist is a part-time (10 hours per week, $40/hour) position in the DC Center’s Anti-Violence Project, with funding at minimum through March 31, 2021 and potential continued funding through 2022. Currently, the work is remote. If the pandemic conditions shift toward reliable public safety, work may resume in-person at The DC Center’s location in Northwest Washington, DC. Limited street parking is accessible. The U St Metro is one block from the center. Agency does not pay for parking. There is limited funding available for weekly clinical supervision if desired. The position may be extended upon receipt of additional funding and could expand to a full-time opportunity. The person who fills this position is also responsible for keeping notes in the MyClients+ EHR system. The Contract Therapist will report to the full-time licensed Therapist/Advocate. Schedule is flexible. Stable internet and a remote working environment which protects confidentiality is essential.

Special Skills:

The Therapist/Advocate must have the appropriate licensure to practice in DC (LGSW, LICSW, LPC) and have at least 2 years’ experience working as a clinician with a diverse client population. They must also have a demonstrated ability to work with LGBTQ+ adults, to work well in a team, to problem solve and communicate at all levels verbally as well as in writing. Must be self-motivated, ethical, and ideally be knowledgeable with key stakeholders in the larger victim-serving network of Washington, DC. Bilingual capabilities in Spanish and English is desired. Expertise in transgender and gender non-binary clinical issues is a plus.

Functions and Duties:

  • Provide individual and group mental health support services, via telecounseling or in-person if public safety permits the DC Center to return to in-person operations, to a minimum caseload of 5-8 unique clients, 45-minute individual sessions and/or 1.5-hour group sessions.
  • Conduct intake assessments with all new potential clients to assess safety, job status, financial resources, living arrangements, current support system, type and history of victimization, legal issues, related medical history, and clinical symptomatology.
  • Provide clients with LGBTQ-friendly and affirming referrals to community-based services, aimed at assisting individuals affected by crime, violence, and trauma.
  • Assess clients and provide necessary intervention in crisis situations (safety plans, hospitalization, referrals, etc.)
  • Keep current and accurate records of all clinical interactions in an electronic clinical database system (MyClients+).
  • Meet weekly with Therapist/Advocate for case review and/or support.
  • Work well with a diverse staff to facilitate an open, supportive and warm environment for all individuals who connect with The DC Center and represent the DC Center professionally within the community.

 

Please click here to apply

Job Opening at the DC Center : Program Assistant for Center Aging

Job Opportunities at the DC Center for the LGBT Community

The DC Center for the LGBT Community has a mission of educating, empowering, celebrating, and connecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community of Washington, DC. The Program Assistant for Center Aging helps to achieve this mission by providing support services to the older adult community members. These services are available free-of-charge to our community members due to grant funding from the DC Department of Aging and Community Living (DACL). The program assistant will report to the Executive Director.

This is a part-time, staff position that will require approximately 20 hours of work per week on the Center Aging LGBTQ Older Adult program.  

The Program Assistant will be in charge of:

  • Managing the Center Aging program, including all of its events, community partner relationships, social media pages, bilingual monthly newsletters, blogs, and more
  • Administering the DACL Center Aging Grant, including drafting all quarterly and final reports, and tracking the budget and workplan,
  • Participating in Center Aging Monthly Advocacy Meetings and other events in the community regarding LGBTQ Older Adults
  • Coordinating Center Aging Volunteers
  • Collecting and storing intake forms of Center Aging participants and providing follow up, assistance, and referrals to participants with specific need.
  • Connect Center Aging participants with other DC Center programs as connections arise.

The ideal candidate will:

  • Have a personal and deep understanding of issues that impact LGBTQIA Older Adults  communities in DC and beyond,
  • Have a personal and deep understanding of issues that impact Older Adults living with HIV/AIDS
  • Have experience with event organizing and planning,
  • Know how to use grassroots organizing methods and social media to reach community members,
  • Be highly self-motivated and able to work flexible hours, including some nights and weekends.

Please click here to apply

30 LGBTQ+ Scholarships For College Students

Individuals within the LGBTQ community are already faced with enough obstacles in their daily lives that they don’t need the added stress of figuring out how to pay for a higher education. Through the means of finding 30 scholarships dedicated to supporting the community, we’re hoping to alleviate some of that stress. Many scholarships go unapplied each year, which means lots of money goes unused. So make sure you check out these scholarships while you’re planning your educational future.

Click Here to learn more.

You Matter, Get Counted !

October 31 is the last day to take the US Census.

WAYS TO PARTICIPATE

The Census can be taken online or over the phone in 13 languages, including English, Arabic, French and Spanish.

Online: To take the Census online visit https://my2020census.gov
Phone: To take the Census over the phone, clients should call the appropriate number here: https://2020census.gov/en/contact-us.html

 

Facts about taking the 2020 Census

 

Does the 2020 Census ask about citizenship status?

NO. The 2020 Census does not ask whether you or anyone in your home is a U.S. citizen.

 

Are non-citizens counted in the census?

YES. Everyone counts. The 2020 Census counts everyone living in the country, including non-citizens. Learn more about who should be counted when you complete the 2020 Census.

 

Can my answers be shared with law enforcement or used against me?

NO. The law prevents the Census Bureau from sharing your information with law enforcement. Your answers cannot be used to impact your eligibility for government benefits. Your answers are only used to create statistics about our country. The Census Bureau is bound by Title 13 of the U.S. Code to protect your personal information and keep it strictly confidential. That’s every answer, to every question.

 

Can I only take the census online?

NO. The 2020 Census will be available online, by phone, and by mail. Online and phone responses can be completed in 13 languages (English, Spanish, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, Russian, Arabic, Tagalog, Polish, French, Haitian Creole, Portuguese, and Japanese). A paper form will be mailed to every house that hasn’t responded already when we send our fourth mail piece out.

 

What questions WILL NOT be asked by the Census Bureau?

During the 2020 Census, the Census Bureau will never ask you for:

Your Social Security number.
Money or donations.
Anything on behalf of a political party.
Your bank or credit card account numbers.

Get counted, click on the links below:
Online: To take the Census online visit https://my2020census.gov
Phone: To take the Census over the phone, clients should call the appropriate number here: https://2020census.gov/en/contact-us.html

Financial Literacy Housing Program

Community Life Services currently has openings in their Financial Literacy Housing Program and are seeking clients to fill them.
Women who have been a victim of domestic violence or justice involved & experienced trauma will receive rental assistance for 12 months as they transition to permanent housing. As part of the program, they will have the support of a case manager who will guide them through learning money management techniques. They will have the opportunity to save money with the goal of being positioned to pay their full rent within a year.
To set up your appointment call:
Joanne Langevin
202 849-2302

COVID-19 State of Emergency: Tenant Rights & Resources – DC

COVID-19 State of Emergency: Tenant Rights & Resources

The purpose of this document is to assist District renters in understanding their rights and
available resources during the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (“Emergency”) declared by
Mayor Muriel Bowser. Mayor Bowser has extended the Emergency to Friday, October 9, 2020.
1
The D.C. Office of the Tenant Advocate (OTA) has suspended its regular walk-in hours, Mondays
through Thursdays, 9:00 am to 4:00 pm, for the duration of the Emergency. We are otherwise
committed to providing our full range of services.

 

I. OTA Telecommute Services
a. Legal Branch: Tenants needing legal services should contact OTA’s hotline. Either:
i. Go online to https://ota.dc.gov/; click on “OTA Housing Assistance” and
“Community Service”; click on “Ask the Director” and complete the request; and
then click “Submit”; or
ii. Call 202-719-6560 and leave a message.

b. Policy Branch: Tenants who have requests or questions regarding policy matters should
send an email to Legislative Director Joel Cohn at Joel.Cohn@dc.gov.

c. Outreach and Education Branch: Tenants who have requests or questions regarding
education and outreach services should send an email to Education and Outreach
Coordinator Stephen Dudek at Stephen.Dudek@dc.gov. Mr. Dudek is conducting virtual
trainings during the Emergency.

d. Emergency Housing Assistance: OTA will respond to displacements in collaboration with
the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (DCRA), DC Homeland Security
(HSEMA), or the American Red Cross.

 

II. Tenant rights & protections during the Emergency2
a. Rent Increase Freeze & Rent Collection

i. Rent increase freeze:
1. Rent increases during the Emergency are prohibited. This applies to rent
controlled and non-rent controlled units alike.

2. Any rent increase notice that was issued during the Emergency, or that
was to take effect during the Emergency, is null and void. The landlord
must issue a new 30-day notice when the Emergency ends.

3. Any rent increase notice that was issued before the Emergency, but that
was to take effect after the Emergency, is also null and void. The landlord
must issue a new 30-day notice when the Emergency ends.

 

ii. Tenant duty to pay frozen rent amount: The laws governing tenant’s duty to
pay rent, other than rent increases, have not changed.

1. Except as explained in item (iv) below, the tenant is still obligated to pay
rent in the amount charged just prior to the start of the emergency.
2. In the event of financial hardship, the tenant should notify the housing
provider and ask for an alternative payment plan. Any such plan should
be put in writing and should be achievable.

iii. Mortgage relief:

1. A mortgage lender must create a mortgage deferment program.
2. Lenders must report approved applications to the D.C. Department of
Insurance Securities and Banking (DISB) on or before June 4th and then
every 15 days thereafter.

3. DISB must publish a list of approved applications.
4. An owner who qualifies for a mortgage deferral must notify all tenants
within 5 days of the availability of a rent payment plan (see below).

iv. Rent Payment Plans:

1. Landlords must develop a rent payment plan and make it available to
tenants during the Emergency and for one year thereafter.
2. The plan must cover all rent due during the Emergency, and for up to one
year thereafter, so long as the tenant remains a tenant.
3. The landlord must also include in the rent payment plan any amenity fee
or other fee that is a part of the lease.
4. To be eligible, a tenant must demonstrate to the landlord that the
Emergency caused the tenant a direct or indirect financial hardship.
5. Rent payment plans must have a minimum term length of one year,
unless the tenant requests a shorter term.
6. Any repayment of the deferred rent amount shall be made in equal
monthly installments, unless the tenant requests otherwise.
7. The tenant cannot lose any rights under the lease by entering into a
payment plan.
8. Landlords must establish an application procedure, and must accept
applications by telephone and online; the landlord cannot deny an
application that includes certain supporting documentation.

9. The tenant may file a complaint with the Rent Administrator if the
landlord denies their application for a rent payment plan.
10. The landlord is not allowed to report to credit bureaus any delinquency
arising from the tenant’s participation in a payment plan.

v. Form of payment:

The laws governing the form of rent payments have not changed.
1. If the lease requires the tenant to pay by money order or in a fashion that
requires the tenant to leave their home, the tenant may contact the
housing provider to discuss alternative payment options.
2. Alternative options may include paying rent online via a wire transfer or
an app such as Venmo, PayPal, Zelle, or otherwise.
3. The agreement should be in writing, and it should specify the period of
time during which the agreed upon options are available to the tenant
(likely at least until the Emergency ends).

b. Evictions

i. Landlords are prohibited from evicting any tenant during the Emergency.
ii. Landlords are prohibited from filing an eviction complaint during the Emergency and for 60 days thereafter.
iii. Landlords are prohibited from serving eviction summonses during the Emergency.
iv. Landlord cannot evict a tenant without a Court order; following the Emergency,landlord must schedule the eviction anew, and then provide tenant with 21 days’ notice of the eviction date.

c. Utility Services & Late Fees

i. Utility companies (electric, gas, water, cable, and telecommunications) are
prohibited from disconnecting services during the state of emergency and for 15
days following the end of the emergency.
ii. Please note, cable and telecommunications companies may reduce services due
to the nonpayment of a bill, so long as they maintain a basic level of service.
iii. Housing providers are prohibited from charging a late fee during the emergency.
A fee for late payment of rent due March 1st remains valid, if the grace period
expired before the start of the Emergency on March 11th.
.

d. Utility Payment Plans

i. A utility provider (gas, electric, DC Water, telecommunications, cable) must offer
a payment plan for eligible customers for amounts that come due during the
program period.

ii. The “program period” is the PHE plus:
1. 60 days for a cable or telecommunications operator not regulated by the Public Service Commission.

2. Six months for any other utility provider.
iii. To be eligible, a customer must notify the provider of an inability to pay all or a
portion of the amount due as a result of the public health emergency.
iv. During the PHE, a utility provider regulated by the Public Service Commission
shall reconnect service to occupied residential property upon customer request and not charge a fee for this reconnection.

 

e. Deadlines for the exercise of tenant and tenant association rights

i. All deadlines for the exercise of tenant and tenant association rights under both
the Rental Housing Act of 1985 and the Rental Housing Conversion and Sale Act
of 1980 (including TOPA) have been extended.
ii. Specifically, any such deadline is tolled – or paused – until the end of the Emergency plus an additional 30 days.
iii. Example:
1. Tenants in a building with 5 or more units receive an offer of sale on
March 1, 2020, from the housing provider.
2. Under the law, they have 45 days, or until April 15, 2020, to create a
tenant association and submit to the landlord a letter of interest in purchasing the building.
3. On March 11, 2020, the Mayor declares a state of emergency.
4. When the Mayor lifts the state of emergency, the tenants will have a
total of 65 days (45 – 10 + 30) to respond to the offer of sale.

f. Tenant Notices of Intent to Vacate

i. The tenant may elect to toll or pause a Notice of Intent to Vacate submitted to
the landlord prior to the Emergency for the Emergency’s duration.
ii. When the Emergency ends, the tenant will have exactly the same number of
days remaining to vacate unit as they had before the Emergency started.
iii. The tenant will not be deemed to be a “holdover tenant,” one who fails to
vacate by the date promised. This is important because under DC law, a
holdover tenant can be evicted and is liable for double the rent.

g. Landlord access to rental units

i. The laws governing landlord access to a rental unit have not been specifically
changed. The landlord could be within their rights to enter the unit to conduct
repairs, inspections, to show the unit to a prospective purchaser, etc.

ii. The tenant should be aware of the existing law. Except in the case of an
emergency situation in the building, the landlord must provide the tenant with:
1. A 48-hour written notice (a text message or email suffices); AND
2. Can only access the unit Monday through Saturday, between 9 am and 5
pm, except for District holidays, unless the tenant agrees otherwise.

iii. Regarding concerns about spreading the COVID-19 virus, the tenant may request
that the landlord defer non-essential work until after the emergency, and inquire
about the health and safety precautions being taken. All parties should:
1. Practice social distancing;
   2. Wear protective gear (masks and gloves) as appropriate;
3. Make sure that the apartment is cleaned / disinfected after visitors leave;
4. Wash hands with soap and hot water for 20 seconds.

 

h. Cleaning of Common Areas

i. Landlord must clean common areas on a regular basis, including surfaces that
are regularly touched, such as doors, railings, seating, and the exterior of mailboxes.

i. Requirement of Masks in Residential Buildings

i. All “essential businesses”—including residences and residential facilities—must
ensure employees, contractors, and visitors wear a face mask and honor social distancing upon entering the building.
ii. Essential businesses are required to post signage at their entrances instructing all
employees, contractors, customers, guests and visitors to:
1. Wear a mask or face covering;
2. Maintain six (6) feet of distance from each other person who is not part of their household;
3. Cough and sneeze away from people and into one’s elbow or shirt; and
4. Not shake hands or engage in any other unnecessary physical contact.
iii. Individuals must wear a mask in the common areas of apartments, condominiums and cooperatives.
iv. Individuals may report violations of the Mayor’s order for not wearing masks to
the Office of the Attorney General. Individuals found in violation of the Mayor’s
order may be subject to fines up to $1,000 per violation.

 

j. Amenity Fee Refunds at rent controlled units

i. Where the tenant pays an amenity fee in addition to the rent, and where the
amenity is made temporarily unavailable as is consistent with an Emergency order, the landlord must provide a pro rata refund of the fee.
ii. Where a service or facility fee is lawfully included in the rent charged, and the service or facility is made temporarily unavailable as is consistent with an Emergency order, the landlord does not have to reduce the rent charged.

 

III. Tenant Associations (TA)

a. A TA should heed the COVID-19 Emergency orders and recommendations of District
government and the Center for Disease Control, including not hosting in-person
meetings involving social gathering.
b. If a TA needs to hold a special meeting, it should explore and execute an online option.
c. If a TA needs to hold a vote during the emergency, the TA should consider amending the
bylaws to permit electronic, online, or virtual voting as appropriate.
d. If you have relevant questions or concerns, contact OTA’s Education and Outreach
Coordinator Stephen Dudek at Stephen.Dudek@dc.gov.

IV. Court Procedures

a. D.C. Superior Court: Evictions
i. As of June 24, 2020, all trials including at Landlord & Tenant Court scheduled on or before August 14, 2020, are continued.
ii. All evictions of tenants and foreclosed homeowners on or before August 14, 2020, are stayed. This applies to tenancies under both oral and written leases.
iii. The landlord may not file an eviction action in court until 60 days following the end of the Emergency.

b. D.C. Superior Court: Other actions & emergencies
i. All Small Claims Court and Housing Conditions Calendars are continued pending further notice from the Court.
ii. In the event of an emergency need for court action – including at Housing Conditions Calendar — tenants can file emergency motions and applications for waiver of prepayment of cost (Fee Waiver Applications) by emailing these
documents to Civilefiling@dcsc.gov.
iii. Tenants should NOT go to the Moultrie Court House to file emergency motions.

c. D.C. Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH)
i. OAH is operating on a modified schedule at least until October 9, 2020.
ii. All hearings, except emergency hearings as designated by the Mayor, are canceled through October 9, 2020.
iii. OAH will notify the litigants of their new hearing date.
iv. Until further notice, all hearings will be conducted by telephone.
v. If you cannot participate in a hearing by telephone or do not want to, you must advise OAH. OAH will reschedule your hearing to a time when in-person hearings
are authorized to resume.
vi. Please, communicate with OAH electronically, by emailing OAH at
oah.filing@dc.gov, or call 202-442-9094.

 

 

 

 

 

This document was sourced from https://ota.dc.gov/

Navigating Professional Settings as a Nonbinary Person

Navigating Professional Settings as a Non-Binary/Trans* Person

Coming out as non-binary or trans* can be uncomfortable in straight, cis-normative settings – especially the workplace. At work, we may not feel we can speak up when we are uncomfortable, defend ourselves from inappropriate comments, or express ourselves in the same way would if we were off the clock. We may not have LGBTQ+ colleagues or friends at work who can relate to our experiences or allies we can turn to for support when we need help. We may fear potential consequences of coming out such as discrimination, harassment, or disciplinary action.

Coming out has been an important and deeply personal part of my journey to live an authentic and meaningful life, and when I share this aspect of my identity with others, I hope to feel respected and embraced. I have recently had the privilege to work for an organization that prioritizes diversity, but even then, introducing and normalizing non-binary pronouns has been a challenge. As a non-binary person with fluid gender expression, I find myself coming out over and over again as I continue to meet new people. Because my physical features tend to appear feminine no matter how I express myself, many of my non-LGBTQ+ colleagues have needed ongoing reminders and explanations to help them learn my pronouns.

The emotional labor and weight of having to repeatedly come out at work, correct colleagues when incorrect pronouns are used, or serve as a token non-binary or trans* person can feel hurtful and exhausting at times. Most of my youth and adult life has been lived trying to navigate being queer in straight and cis-normative spaces. Perhaps you can relate. Having navigated professional settings as a non-binary trans* person many times, I’ve finally found a few strategies that have greatly helped remove some of this burden from my shoulders, and I hope they might benefit you too.

Wearing a Pronoun Pin

Wearing a pin or button has been the most helpful strategy I have used to help encourage my colleagues to remember to use my pronouns at work. Some days, mine will say “They/Them” and other days it will say “Non-Binary”. Sometimes I wear it on my suit jacket or shirt, and other times I’ll wear it on my lanyard if I’m wearing my ID badge. Pins have been a discreet, professional, and effective way to provide others a visual clue to use correct gender pronouns. Pins are also affordable and can be ordered easily online, but they only work when you’re speaking to your colleagues in person.

Listing your Pronouns on your Email Signature and Business Cards

Including your pronouns in your email signature is a helpful way to both let your colleagues know what your gender pronouns are when you’re working virtually and normalize diverse gender pronouns within your organization. You can use this same principle by printing your pronouns on your business cards. Businesses can benefit from implementing this as a routine practice to help current LGBTQ+ employees feel safer and to help the organization be more inclusive to new employees and the clientele it serves.

Welcoming Images and Items in your Personal Office Space

Displaying LGBTQ+, non-binary, or trans* imagery in your personal workspace can help show others that you are supportive and welcoming of LGBTQ+ clients and colleagues, and often inspires allies to follow suit. It can also remind others that you personally identify as LGBTQ+ and can help serve as a visual reminder of your pronouns if you have come out at work.

Make a Small Lending Library Available to Your Colleagues

Having books and reference guides available to be borrowed can be an accommodating way to help colleagues who may feel too shy or don’t have the time to have a lengthy conversation with you about how to help make LGBTQ+ people feel safer in the workplace. A text they can bring home can help them learn privately and at their own pace. One text I personally like to keep on my desk for this purpose is  A Quick and Easy Guide to They/Them Pronouns. I wouldn’t say it’s a perfect text, but it’s written as a graphic novel and uses a casual and humorous tone, which I like because it makes for a quick and easy read for busy people. If you choose to start a lending library at your office, make sure you’ve read the entirety of each text you make available to ensure the content is appropriate for the workplace.

State Your Pronouns When You Introduce Yourself

Each time you have the opportunity to introduce yourself to a new person or even a group of familiar people, take the opportunity to state your pronouns – even if no one follows your lead at first. This helps remind the group of your pronouns, models how to be inclusive of diverse gender identity, and invites them to help normalize diverse gender pronouns in the organization and perhaps even in their personal lives.

Correct Others When They Misgender You 

This can be a tough one. If you feel comfortable and safe enough to do so, correct others when they misgender you – to the extent possible. You can choose to do this immediately after it happens, or privately at a later time. However, sometimes being mis-gendered can happen so many times a day that it may not feel possible or reasonable to correct every person you come across. Only do what feels right and is comfortable for you.

If An Ally Wants to Support You, Let Them Know What You Need

Having allies at work can be tremendously helpful to make the workplace safer for LGBTQ+ people. However, sometimes allies may not know how to support non-binary or trans* people, and may have questions they’re too nervous to ask. They may be unsure how to respond when they overhear a peer use incorrect gender pronouns, or what they should do if they mis-gender someone by accident. Asking these questions can be so uncomfortable for some that it can be easier not to engage or show support at all.

In these situations, I have found success in being vulnerable and inviting about asking uncomfortable questions from the start. When someone expresses support for me, I thank them and let them know how happy and safe it makes me feel when they help me correct my peers about my gender pronouns. I let them know precisely what I would be comfortable with them sharing about me if they find themselves in a situation where they want to help correct others about my pronouns, and let them know that if they ever have questions, they may feel free to ask me about it. I also let them know that it’s okay to mess up, because what matters most to me is just a consistent effort to get it right.

While I recognize the strategies I listed above may not be applicable or possible in all work environments, I hope that they bring you some relief and tangible tactics to help improve your experience at work. I also recognize we may not always feel safe or generous enough to want to help our colleagues learn about how to be more inclusive toward LGBTQ+ people, and would sometimes prefer others take initiative to do the research on their own. If one thing is certain, however, it is that we all deserve to feel safe, respected, and valued at work and in our personal lives. To my surprise, I have been fortunate to find more allies and friends by coming out at work than I had originally expected.

 

Information sourced from https://myumbrella.co/

Covid-19 and HIV

Although the risk of serious illness from COVID-19 for people with HIV is not known, people with HIV may have concerns and questions related to their risk.

This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation and CDC will provide updated information as it becomes available.

 

Are people with HIV at higher risk for Covid-19 than other people ?

At the present time, we have no specific information about the risk of COVID-19 in people with HIV.

Older adults and people of any age who have a serious underlying medical condition might be at higher risk for severe illness, including people who are immunocompromised. The risk for people with HIV getting very sick is greatest in:

  • People with a low CD4 cell count, and
  • People not on HIV treatment (antiretroviral therapy or ART).

People with HIV can also be at increased risk of getting very sick with COVID-19 based on their age and other medical conditions.

 

What can people with HIV do to protect themselves from COVID-19.

There is currently no vaccine to prevent COVID-19. The best way to prevent getting sick is to avoid exposure to the virus.

People with HIV should take everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

People with HIV should also continue to maintain a healthy lifestyle. This includes:

Staying healthy helps your immune system fight off infection should it occur.

If you have HIV and are taking your HIV medicine, it is important to continue your treatment and follow the advice of your health care provider. This is the best way to keep your immune system healthy.

What should I do if I think I might have Covid-19?

Call your health care provider if you develop symptoms that could be consistent with COVID-19. Discuss how to get evaluated and how to avoid potentially exposing others to COVID-19.

Learn more about COVID-19 and what to do if you get sick.

 

What else can people with HIV who are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 do to protect themselves?

Nearly half of people in the United States with diagnosed HIV are aged 50 years and older. People with HIV also have higher rates of certain underlying health conditions. Both increased age and these conditions can increase their risk for more severe illness if people with HIV get COVID-19, especially people with advanced HIV.

Steps that people with HIV can take to prepare in addition to what is recommended for everybody:

  • Make sure you have at least a 30-day supply of your HIV medicine and any other medications or medical supplies you need for managing HIV.
  • Talk to your health care provider and make sure all your vaccinations are up-to-date, including vaccinations against seasonal influenza and bacterial pneumonia because these vaccine preventable diseases disproportionally affect people with HIV.
  • Establish a plan for clinical care if you have to stay at home for a couple of weeks. Try to establish a telemedicine link through your HIV care provider’s online portal. If telemedicine is not available to you, make sure you can communicate with your provider by phone or text.
  • Make sure you can maintain a social network remotely, such as online, by phone, or by video chat. This can help you stay socially connected and mentally healthy, which is especially important for people with HIV.
  • People with HIV can sometimes be more likely than others to need extra help, from friends, family, neighbors, community health workers, and others. If you become sick make sure you stay in touch by phone or email with people who can help you.

 

Can HIV medicine (ART) be used to treat Covid-19?

Some types of HIV medicine (for example, lopinavir-ritonavir) to treat COVID-19 are being evaluated. Results from a clinical trialexternal icon in China showed that lopinavir-ritonavir did not speed up recovery or reduce the amount of virus produced in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and pneumonia. More than 15 clinical trials of HIV medicines are registered on ClinicalTrials.govexternal icon. Until more is known about the effects of these medicines on COVID-19, people with HIV should not switch their HIV medicine in an attempt to prevent or treat COVID-19.

 

Are shortages of HIV medicine (ART)  or pre-exposure prophylaxis (PreP) expected?

Drug shortages or anticipated problems with HIV medicine have not been identified.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is closely monitoring the drug supply chain as the COVID-19 outbreak has the potential to disrupt the supply of medical and pharmaceutical products in the United States.

The National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors (NASTAD) has also remained in contact with the major manufacturers of HIV medicine as many of these products rely on ingredients produced in China.

As of March 10, 2020, there were no reports of manufacturing concerns or supply shortages.

Learn more about the FDA’s response to COVID-19external icon.

 

Should people with HIV travel at this time?

For the latest CDC travel recommendations, visit CDC’s COVID-19 travel information page.

 

What can everyone do to minimize the stigma about Covid-19?

Minimizing stigma and misinformation about COVID-19 is very important. People with HIV have experience in dealing with stigma and can be allies in preventing COVID-19 stigma. Learn how you can reduce stigma and help prevent the spread of rumors about COVID-19.

 

 

 

Information sourced from the Center for Disease Control.

Red Cross Volunteer Recruitment – Virtual Spanish Open House – 6.10.2020

Convierta la compasión en acción!
Acompáñenos en una jornada de puertas abiertas de reclutamiento virtual el 10 de junio de 5:30-6:30pm
¡AHORA es el momento perfecto para UNIRSE A NOSOTROS … ENTRENARSE … y PREPARARSE para ayudar a su comunidad local!
¡Venga a escuchar, a aprender y a hacer sus preguntas! La jornada de puertas abiertas se llevará a cabo a través de la aplicación Microsoft Teams. ¡Puede acompañarnos desde su teléfono o computadora! Le proporcionaremos un enlace al evento por correo electrónico al completar el siguiente formulario de registro: https://volunteerconnection.redcross.org/?nd=vms_public_form&form_id=8008
This is a message from Red Cross, the DC Center has no affiliation with the red cross