Happy Presidents’ Day

Happy Presidents Day from the team at the DC Center.

On this day we look forward to seeing all the promises that the Biden Administration has made, come to fruition. We believe Mr Biden is an ally to our community, in 2012, in the midst of what many expected to be a tough reelection campaign for the Obama White House, Biden surprised the political world during an appearance on “Meet the Press” by becoming the first national leader to publicly support same-sex marriage as president the Joe Biden administration issued an executive order that is aimed at preventing discrimination on the basis of gender identity or sexual orientation and prohibiting workplace discrimination in the federal government, he also signed an order reversing a Trump-era Pentagon policy that largely barred transgender individuals from serving in the military. President Joe Biden has tapped Pennsylvania Health Secretary Rachel Levine to be his assistant secretary of health, leaving her poised to become the first openly transgender federal official to be confirmed by the U.S. Senate.

Undetected: More Than A Status

In honor of National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day and Black History month,  join us  for our special programing highlighting the strengths and weaknesses in the black community and how we move forward – together – stronger . will be a having a candid talk about how HIV and Stigma affects the black community , paneled by local and national activist from around the United States. One of our panelist is Shawnte Spriggs, Shawnte Spriggs is a phenomenal speaker, writer and advocate who continues to do phenomenal work in the Black community for individuals living with HIV. From facilitating support groups and attending grant meetings to the birth of her prolific book, Undetected: More Than A Status, Shawnte has continued to battle HIV stigma towards advancement of the Black community. Below is a quick synapsis of her book. For individuals who join our programming, we will be offering free copies of her inspirational book.

Summary: 
Undetected is a quick and easy read to help better understand the emotional challenges and outcomes a person living with HIV can undergo during their journey to overall wellness. This book is designed for individuals diagnosed with HIV, their Friends and Family and anyone servicing people living with HIV. This book will: (1) Show you common emotions and mindsets associated with this diagnosis; (2) Review the effects of past and unresolved Trauma; (3)Share various ways support can possibly look for a person living with HIV; (4) Provide practical and healthy tips to render positive and productive results.

Purchase a Copy

Amazon link

 

February is Black History Month

February is Black History Month
Theme
2021- The Black Family: Representation, Identity, and Diversity.
 
The DC Center is excited to explore and celebrate #BlackHistoryMonth as we support all black lives, black families, black history, and culture during this awesome time of education, unity, and support! Black History Month recognizes the many, often overlooked, contributions African Americans have made to America’s history. The evolution of Black History Month has an interesting history of its own, and dates back to the end of the Civil War. The DC Center will host various virtual events to honor the legacy of African American families in the context of their storied past and present. We will also post several stories on influential African Americans.
Who started Black History Month?
Carter G. Woodson, known as the “Father of Black History,” developed Black History Month. Woodson, whose parents were enslaved, was an author, historian and the second African American to earn a Ph.D. at Harvard University.
He recognized that the American education system offered very little information about the accomplishments of African Americans and founded the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, now called the Association for the Study of African American Life and History.

In 1926, Woodson proposed a national “Negro History Week,” which was intended to showcase everything students learned about Black history throughout the school year.

By the time of Woodson’s death in 1950, Negro History Week had become a central part of African American life and substantial progress had been made in bringing more Americans to appreciate the celebration. At mid–century, mayors of cities nationwide issued proclamations noting Negro History Week. The Black Awakening of the 1960s dramatically expanded the consciousness of African Americans about the importance of black history, and the Civil Rights movement focused Americans of all colors on the subject of the contributions of African Americans to our history and culture.

The celebration was expanded to a month in 1976, the nation’s bicentennial. President Gerald R. Ford urged Americans to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.” That year, fifty years after the first celebration, the association held the first African American History Month. By this time, the entire nation had come to recognize the importance of Black history in the drama of the American story. Since then each American president has issued African American History Month proclamations.

But why is February designated as the month to commemorate African American history?

February is the birth month of two figures who loom large in the Black past: U.S. President Abraham Lincoln (born February 12), who issued the Emancipation Proclamation, and African American abolitionist, author, and orator Frederick Douglass (born February 14). Since the deaths of Lincoln and Douglass (in 1865 and 1895, respectively), the Black community had celebrated their contributions to African American liberation and civil rights on their birthdays.

 

Notable African American Heroes

7 Facts on George Washington Carver - BiographyGeorge Washington Carver was born enslaved and went on to become one of the most prominent scientists and inventors of his time, as well as a teacher at the Tuskegee Institute. Carver devised over 100 products using one major crop — the peanut. He experimented with the legumes to make lotions, flour, soups, dyes, plastics, and gasoline—though not peanut butter! Find out more about George Carver.

 

 

 

 

 

Shirley Chisholm | National Women's History MuseumShirley Anita St. Hill Chisholm was the first African American woman in Congress (1968) and the first woman and African American to seek the nomination for president of the United States from one of the two major political parties (1972).

Discrimination followed Chisholm’s quest for the 1972 Democratic Party presidential nomination. She was blocked from participating in televised primary debates, and after taking legal action, was permitted to make just one speech. Still, students, women, and minorities followed the “Chisholm Trail.” She entered 12 primaries and garnered 152 of the delegates’ votes (10% of the total)—despite an under-financed campaign and contentiousness from the predominantly male Congressional Black Caucus. Chisholm retired from Congress in 1983. Find out more about Shirley Chisholm

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harriet Tubman - Quotes, Underground Railroad & Facts - BiographyBorn into slavery, Harriet Tubman escaped to freedom in the North in 1849 and then risked her life to lead other enslaved people to freedom.

Tubman suffered lifelong pain and illness due to her mistreatment while enslaved. Find out more about Harriet Tubman.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Martin Luther King Jr. - Day, Quotes & Assassination - Biography

Martin Luther King Jr. (born Michael King Jr.; January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) was an American Baptist minister and activist who became the most visible spokesperson and leader in the Civil Rights Movement from 1955 until his assassination in 1968. King is best known for advancing civil rights through nonviolence and civil disobedience, inspired by his Christian beliefs and the nonviolent activism of Mahatma Gandhi. He was the son of early civil rights activist Martin Luther King, Sr..

King participated in and led marches for blacks’ right to vote, desegregation, labor rights, and other basic civil rights . Find out more about Martin Luther King Jr.

 

 

 

Transgender icon Marsha P. Johnson to be honored with monument in N.J. hometown

Marsha P Johnson is best known for her role in the 1969 Stonewall uprising and for her work supporting low-income LGBTQ people of color. Alongside fellow transgender pioneer Sylvia Rivera, Johnson co-founded the Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries, a political collective that provided housing for queer youth and sex workers in lower Manhattan. Find out more about Marsha P Johnson.

 

 

 

 

James Baldwin - Quotes, Books & Poems - Biography Born in Harlem, New York, Aug. 2, 1924, James Baldwin was an essayist, novelist, playwright, poet, and social justice advocate. Baldwin is regarded as one of the foremost intellectual thinkers of the 20th century for voicing his concerns around identity, creativity and freedom. As an openly gay man during a time when homosexuality was taboo, Baldwin explored the intersections of his identities through several published works. Baldwin’s work considered what it meant to be human and explored our everyday struggles, victories, and defeats during one of the most turbulent times for blacks in America. Find out more about James Baldwin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ernestine Eckstein | Making Gay History Ernestine Eckstein (April 23, 1941 – July 15, 1992) was an African-American woman who helped steer the United States Lesbian and Gay rights movement during the 1960s. She was a leader in the New York chapter of Daughters of Bilitis (DOB). Her influence helped the DOB move away from negotiating with medical professionals and towards tactics of public demonstrations. Her understanding of, and work in, the Civil Rights Movement lent valuable experience on public protest to the lesbian and gay movement. Eckstein worked among activists such as Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin, Barbara Gittings, Franklin Kameny, and Randy Wicker. In the 1970s she became involved in the black feminist movement, in particular the organization Black Women Organized for Action (BWOA). Find out more about Ernestine Eckstein. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

These are just some of the many African Americans who have made a mark on us as a people and our country. We will use this month to highlight even more heroes.  

Team DC Scholarship Opportunity

About the Scholarship

Team DC Student-Athlete Scholarships provide up to $2,000 of financial support to offset the cost of educational expenses. Scholarships are awarded to self-identified lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ+) student-athletes who have contributed to the sport in which they participate and enhanced the perception of the LGBT community as a result of their contributions and involvement.

Scholarships are given to graduating high school seniors in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area who will attend an accredited two- or four-year college or university. Candidates must demonstrate dedication to both academic and athletic excellence as well as show promise as an LGBTQ+ role model.

Click here to learn more and apply!

FDA Approves 1st Long-acting HIV Drug Combo, Monthly Shots

HIV Working Group

U.S. regulators have approved the first long-acting drug combo for HIV, monthly shots that can replace the daily pills now used to control infection with the AIDS virus.

Thursday’s approval of the two-shot combo called Cabenuva is expected to make it easier for people to stay on track with their HIV medicines and to do so with more privacy. It’s a huge change from not long ago, when patients had to take multiple pills several times a day, carefully timed around meals.

“That will enhance quality of life” to need treatment just once a month, said Dr. Steven Deeks, an HIV specialist at the University of California, San Francisco, who has no ties to the drug’s makers. “People don’t want those daily reminders that they’re HIV infected.”

Cabenuva combines rilpivirine, sold as Edurant by Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen unit, and a new drug — cabotegravir, from ViiV Healthcare. They’re packaged together and given as separate shots once a month. Dosing every two months also is being tested.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Cabenuva for use in adults who have had their disease well controlled by conventional HIV medicines and who have not shown signs of viral resistance to the two drugs in Cabenuva.

The agency also approved a pill version of cabotegravir to be taken with rilpivarine for a month before switching to the shots to be sure the drugs are well tolerated.

ViiV said the shot combo would cost $5,940 for an initial, higher dose and $3,960 per month afterward. The company said that is “within the range” of what one-a-day pill combos cost now. How much a patient pays depends on insurance, income and other things.

Studies found that patients greatly preferred the shots.

“Even people who are taking one pill once a day just reported improvement in their quality of life to switch to an injection,” said Dr. Judith Currier, an HIV specialist at the University of California, Los Angeles. She consults for ViiV and wrote a commentary accompanying one study of the drug in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Deeks said long-acting shots also give hope of reaching groups that have a hard time sticking to treatment, including people with mental illness or substance abuse problems.

“There’s a great unmet need” that the shots may fill, he said.

Separately, ViiV plans to seek approval for cabotegravir for HIV prevention. Two recent studies found that cabotegravir shots every two months were better than daily Truvada pills for keeping uninfected people from catching the virus from an infected sex partner.

 

 

 

Sourced from The National Broadcasting Company

DC Hope Care Holiday Food Distribution

The Mayor’s Office of LGBTQ Affairs has partnered with ServeDC and Us Helping Us, Inc. to provide boxed groceries and prepared meals for their 2020 DC Hope Care Holiday Food Distribution! The distribution will take place on Tuesday, December 22 from 11 AM-3 PM in the small parking lot of Shiloh Baptist Church (1500 9th Street NW). They want to serve as many folks as possible. This event is FREE and boxes and meals will be provided on a first-come, first-serve basis!

Please share with anyone that might be in need.

Job Opening at the DC Center : Trauma-Informed Licensed Contract Therapist

Job Opportunities at the DC Center for the LGBT Community

Are you a trauma-informed, licensed mental health clinician interested in remote work for an established community organization in Washington DC serving the LGBTQ+ community? Are you available 10 hours per week? The DC Center for the LGBT Community is hiring!

The DC Anti-Violence Project of the DC Center for the LGBT Community is seeking a licensed clinician (LICSW/LPC/LGSW) with interest and experience in working with LGBTQ+ survivors of trauma, violence, and abuse. Exceptional interpersonal, ethical and client care skills are required. Fluency in both Spanish and English, and/or expertise in transgender and gender non-binary clinical issues are a plus. Familiarity with MyClients+ or other EHR systems also a plus. Experience in providing telecounseling via Zoom HIPAA-compliant video platform is desired.

Contract Therapist Position:

The DC Center for the LGBT Community has a mission of educating, empowering, celebrating, and connecting the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community of Washington, DC. Licensed therapists (LICSW, LGSW, LPC) help to achieve this mission by providing trauma-informed mental health support services to survivors of violence, crime, and trauma. These services are available free-of-charge to our community members due to grant funding from the Office of Victim Services and Justice Grants (OVSJG). The trauma-informed licensed Contract Therapist is a part-time (10 hours per week, $40/hour) position in the DC Center’s Anti-Violence Project, with funding at minimum through March 31, 2021 and potential continued funding through 2022. Currently, the work is remote. If the pandemic conditions shift toward reliable public safety, work may resume in-person at The DC Center’s location in Northwest Washington, DC. Limited street parking is accessible. The U St Metro is one block from the center. Agency does not pay for parking. There is limited funding available for weekly clinical supervision if desired. The position may be extended upon receipt of additional funding and could expand to a full-time opportunity. The person who fills this position is also responsible for keeping notes in the MyClients+ EHR system. The Contract Therapist will report to the full-time licensed Therapist/Advocate. Schedule is flexible. Stable internet and a remote working environment which protects confidentiality is essential.

Special Skills:

The Therapist/Advocate must have the appropriate licensure to practice in DC (LGSW, LICSW, LPC) and have at least 2 years’ experience working as a clinician with a diverse client population. They must also have a demonstrated ability to work with LGBTQ+ adults, to work well in a team, to problem solve and communicate at all levels verbally as well as in writing. Must be self-motivated, ethical, and ideally be knowledgeable with key stakeholders in the larger victim-serving network of Washington, DC. Bilingual capabilities in Spanish and English is desired. Expertise in transgender and gender non-binary clinical issues is a plus.

Functions and Duties:

  • Provide individual and group mental health support services, via telecounseling or in-person if public safety permits the DC Center to return to in-person operations, to a minimum caseload of 5-8 unique clients, 45-minute individual sessions and/or 1.5-hour group sessions.
  • Conduct intake assessments with all new potential clients to assess safety, job status, financial resources, living arrangements, current support system, type and history of victimization, legal issues, related medical history, and clinical symptomatology.
  • Provide clients with LGBTQ-friendly and affirming referrals to community-based services, aimed at assisting individuals affected by crime, violence, and trauma.
  • Assess clients and provide necessary intervention in crisis situations (safety plans, hospitalization, referrals, etc.)
  • Keep current and accurate records of all clinical interactions in an electronic clinical database system (MyClients+).
  • Meet weekly with Therapist/Advocate for case review and/or support.
  • Work well with a diverse staff to facilitate an open, supportive and warm environment for all individuals who connect with The DC Center and represent the DC Center professionally within the community.

Please send resume and cover letter to kimberley@thedccenter.org.

 

FREE ENGLISH CLASSES FOR ADULTS WINTER 2020

The Literacy Council of Montgomery County, offers free Adult English classes to anyone that is 18 years or older and lives or works in Maryland. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, they will be offering online classes. Interested clients should click on the link with the most suitable schedule.

 

Morning Classes (9:30 am- 1:30pm)

Daytime Classes (10am-2pm)

Evening Classes (6:30pm-9pm and 6:00pm-9pm)

 

 

30 LGBTQ+ Scholarships For College Students

Individuals within the LGBTQ community are already faced with enough obstacles in their daily lives that they don’t need the added stress of figuring out how to pay for a higher education. Through the means of finding 30 scholarships dedicated to supporting the community, we’re hoping to alleviate some of that stress. Many scholarships go unapplied each year, which means lots of money goes unused. So make sure you check out these scholarships while you’re planning your educational future.

Click Here to learn more.