How We Support Survivors of Violence

Mental Health Services at the DC Center for the LGBT Community

Mental Health Services at the DC Center for the LGBT Community

Over the past year, the DC Center for the LGBT Community, has been able to provide vital mental health support services and outreach opportunities to individuals in the community that are both survivors and supporters of survivors of violence, crime, and trauma.  This work is made possible with the support of the Office of Victim Services and the CenterLink-Johnson Family Foundation Mental Health Initiative.

We provided individual and group therapy, case management, and intake assessments to over 50 survivors of violence, crime, and trauma. Sam Goodwin, LGSW, and Dr. Zelaika Clarke provided over 470 individual therapy sessions and provided case management to a total of 42 individuals through warm handoff referrals to trauma-informed providers and organizations.

The DC Anti-Violence Project, a program of the DC Center, has also lso focused on engaging and educating community members through presentations and outreach events, such as our ‘Taking the Stage, Taking a Stand: LGBTQ Voices Against Violence’ event, which uplifted the voices of LGBTQ individuals affected by violence and trauma through various artistic mediums of expression, including dance, song, slam poetry, storytelling and rap. In addition to the 5 ‘Taking the Stage’ events held over the past year, The DC Anti-Violence Project launched several presentations to increase awareness and educate community members, specifically around issues in the LGBTQ community.

One of these community presentations occurred on September 6th, 2017, when The DC Anti-Violence Project provided a community presentation training to rape crisis hotline trainee staff at The DC Rape Crisis Center. This presentation provided an overview of LGBTQ issues and terminology, which included interactive and experiential activities for participants to learn about the needs of LGBTQ survivors of violence, crime, and trauma. Role plays, videos, and didactic learning material were provided to trainee staff, and participants were invited to look at the differences between a negative experience for LGBTQ individuals in contrast to an experience in which service providers practice cultural competency and cultural humility. The DC Anti-Violence Project received a great deal of positive feedback from both participants and DCRCC staff, and have been invited back to train hotline staff in the next year.

Additionally, monthly meetings for The DC Anti-Violence Project are held on the 4th Thursday of every month, from 7-8:30 PM at The DC Center. These meetings attract members of the community searching for ways to get involved with local action to eradicate targeted violence against LGBTQ individuals, and over the past year, have focus on the following efforts: organizing action around local violence and hate/bias crimes against transgender women of color; working with Council Member David Grosso to support legislation for both increasing bystander awareness/intervention and for legalizing sex work in DC; writing community impact statements for LGBTQ-centered cases currently in the DC court system; and planning future community events and outreach with local survivor-serving organizations, such as Safe Bars, Defend Yourself, End Rape on Campus, and Casa Ruby.

Over the past year, The DC Anti-Violence Project has doubled in size of membership, demonstrating the draw and sustainability of this work, propelled forward by the deep passion and commitment of our increasing member base.
This year, The DC Anti-Violence Project was successful in referring over 122 unique individual clients to vital resources and trauma-informed services such as the DC Victim Hotline through the LGBTQ Violence Response Hotline, psychiatrists, medical doctors, and free legal aid services (e.g. The DC Volunteer Lawyer’s Project), Crime Victim’s Compensation, vocational and employment resources and classes, and law enforcement services.

Support this Work

If you would like to support work like this at the DC Center for the LGBT Community, make a donation here.

Find Out More

To find out more about this work visit www.dcavp.org.  You can also find us on facebook as facebook.com/dcantiviolenceproject or on twitter at twitter.com/dcavp.

 

 

Debrief from LGBT Health Report Meeting

DC LGBT Health Report Meeting
DC LGBT Health Report Meeting
DC LGBT Health Report Meeting

The DC Department of Health held an LGBT Health Symposium on Saturday October 21st at the Chevy Chase Community.   Community organizations in attendance included Casa Ruby, The DC Center for the LGBT Community, Smyal, and Whitman Walker Health.

Guillame Bagal took notes from the meeting.  Download Guillame’s notes using the link below.

District of Columbia LGBT Health Symposium 10.21.2017 – gb

More pictures and comments from the Symposium can be found on twitter using the hashtag #LGBTHealthDC.

If you would like to be part of the ongoing conversation about LGBT Health Equity in the District of Columbia like our facebook page at fb.com/lgbthealthdc or follow us on twitter at twitter.com/lgbthealthdc.

 

Volunteers Wanted For Research Study

Sin Marrones, Sin Gays: Experiences of Stigma Among Gay Latino Men in the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Region

Are you over the age of 18?  Do you identify as a gay Latino male?  I am interested in speaking with gay Latino men about their experiences with stereotyping.  The interview would last approximately an hour.  During the interview you would be asked to discuss your view of the gay and Latino communities, your experiences with discrimination because of being gay and/or Latino, and your experiences with religion, machismo, and familismo.  Participants will receive a $30 gift card in appreciation of completing the interview.

For further questions contact Trevor Rose, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, & Health Administration & Policy, at 410-598-2412 or roset2@umbc.edu 

This research is conducted under the direction of Dr. Sarah Chard, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Sociology, Anthropology, & Health Administration & Policy, at 410-455-3380 or schard@umbc.edu

Recruiting Smokers with HIV (Truth Initiative)

 

We are seeking volunteers to participate in a research study being done to understand how to create a quit smoking program for people in the Washington, D.C. area who have HIV and who smoke. We want to understand what type of support system, types of messages, and ways of providing support are best for people living with HIV. Volunteers must be at least 18 years of age, have HIV infection, currently smoke cigarettes every day, and not currently have any major medical condition (such as heart disease not controlled by medication). Participants receive up to $125.

Two study visits are required, which will last approximately 1 hour each. All participants will get advice on how to quit smoking. Some participants will be signed up for a text messaging program, which will last for 30 days.

If you are interested, please contact study staff at 202-454-5746 or lkierstead@truthinitiative.org.

Principal Investigator: Jessica Elf, Chesapeake IRB Protocol #: Pro00022163

Recruiting for TEAM Training Study (GW Cancer Center)

LGBT Cancer Project

TEAM (Together – Equitable – Accessible – Meaningful) Training Study

*en español abajo*

The TEAM education program aims to improve the productivity of patient-provider interactions to promote accessible, equitable and patient-centered care that results in better health outcomes for those impacted by cancer.

We are actively recruiting individuals for telephone interviews who have experienced a diagnosis of cancer, who identify as female, transgender, or genderqueer, and who identify as a:

  • Racial minority (e.g. African American, African Immigrant, Native American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, Asian American, Middle Eastern etc.)​
  • Ethnic minority (e.g. Hispani​​c/Latinx)​​
  • Sexual minority (e.g. Lesbian, Bisexual, Pansexual, etc.)​
  • R​eligious minority (e.g. Muslim, Jewish, Jehovah’s Witness, Buddhist, Hindu, Atheist, Agnostic, etc.​)
  • Resident of a rural area​

Our team at GW is conducting interviews in English and Spanish to inform the development of educational resources for health care providers. Call 202-823-3376 Monday-Saturday between 9am-9pm ET if you would like to participate or learn more! You will receive a $50 Amazon gift card if you complete the focus group.

 

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Ha recibido un diagnostico de cancer? Cuentenos su historia. Los investigadores del Centro de Cancer de la Universidad George Washington estan buscando personas para participar en una entrevista grupal que:

  • Tengan 18 años de edad o mas
  • Recibieron atencion medica por un diagnostico de cancer en Estados Unidos
  • Se identifican como mujeres, transgenero o genderqueer

 

Llamen al 202-823-3853 de lunes a sabado de 9am a 9pm ET si desea participar o conocer mas! Recibira una tarjeta de regalo de Amazon de $50 si completa la entrevista grupal. Vea el volante abajo para mas informacion.

 

 

Meet the Staff: Meet Stacey

This is a weekly newsletter to put a face to the staff at the DC Center. Every week we will be featuring a staff member. This week, meet Stacey! Stacey is our Health & Wellness intern. This summer Stacey has been working with Shareese to help run our weekly packing parties, as well as help found The DC Center’s new yoga program.

Stacey Mannuel

July 18, Cancer
Why did you start working at The DC Center?

I was taking classes part time and I thought pairing that with part time work at an LGBT organization would be fun too.

What is your music anthem?

Stairway to Heaven by Led Zeppelin

What is your favorite part about the LGBTQ+ community?

I love that if you are looking for a home you can find it in our community.

What is your favorite spot in DC and what do you do there?

I like the phallic Washington monument and the tidal basin. When I’m there I typically go for festivals or just a nightly stroll

What do you think the LGBTQ+ community needs to improve on?

We need to work on trans inclusion and media representation of Queer people of color, specifically bisexual members of the community. A lot of media representation of bisexual people involve cheating, manipulation or experimentation… and hardly anyone ever comes out as bisexual!

What is your favorite Queer movie?

Blue is the Warmest Color because it’s the first Queer film I ever saw. I also like Paris is Burning and Tongues Untied because it showed me a new perspective on certain parts of the Queer Community.

What has been your favorite moment while working in The DC Center?

My favorite part while working at The DC Center was meeting another queer Indonesian

What clothing item is a staple in your wardrobe?

Earrings, rings, and bandanas

What color would you paint the White House, given the chance?

I would paint it with murals of the people of color who constructed the house.

Who do you most look up to in the queer community?

Alison Bechdel because I’m in love with her work, Dykes to Look Out For and Fun Home

Queer Women Working Through Trauma

Queer Women Working Through Trauma
Queer Women Working Through Trauma
Queer Women Working Through Trauma

The Queer Women Working Through Trauma group invites individuals to focus on processing and making sense of trauma as a group through a variety of therapeutic techniques, learning to manage triggers and painful memories, and other behavioral processing activities. Participants will also focus on the mind-body connection throughout the course of the group, engaging in art and expression activities, mindful meditation/visualization, deep breathing, gentle stretching and other physical/tactile exercises to help process through trauma responses while creating accessible coping strategies.

This group is currently recruiting for our next cycle, which will begin on June 27th, 2017 from 6 PM – 7 PM at The DC Center (2000 14th Street, NW Suite 105) and run bi-weekly for 10 sessions. If you are interested in joining the next cycle of QWWTT, please contact the group leaders, Sam Goodwin, LGSW, at samantha@thedccenter.org, or Dr. Zelaika Clarke, LGSW at zelaika@thedccenter.org

Latin American Youth Center’s Housing Programs

The Latin American Youth Center’s (LAYC‘s) Drop-In Center is a safe space for youth 24 years old and under, of any race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and gender identity to connect to safe housing resources.
Core services  include:
  • Housing for One Year
  • Intensive Case Management for educational, vocational, health and other needs
  • In-House Mental Health Counseling
  • Assistance finding jobs
  • Support in accessing public benefits
  • Food, laundry, showers, computers, diapers, clothing, and more
For more information, drop by 3045 15th Street NW, Washington, DC, Monday through Friday between 10am and 6pm, or call (202) 713-0475.

Gay & Bi Young Men Needed for Study

Study for Young Gay and Bi Men
Parent Study
Parent Study

Gay & Bi Young Men are invited to participate in a study to learn how you talk about sex with your parent

Download the Study Flyer Here

Researchers at the George Washington University are conducting a study about how parents and sons talk about sex. To be to eligible to participate, you must be (a) between the ages of 14-22; (b) be assigned male at birth; (c) currently identify as male; (d) identify as gay or bi; (e) be out to at least one parent; and (f) live at least two days/week in your parent’s home. For your parents to be eligible to participate, they must be your parent or legal guardian.

Youth receive $50 for their time and effort and parents receive $100.

To participate, you and a parent must be able to participate in an interview for about 90-minutes at GW or a location convenient for you.

To learn more, text/call: 301-541-7405 Or E-mail: huebner.lab@gmail.com